The undergraduate experience at Doane is an immersive, collaborative environment, a community of students, faculty, and staff, that motivates students to take responsibility for their ongoing academic and personal growth. 

The Doane Core Pathway serves as a catalyst for students to develop crucial intellectual skills, build connections of knowledge across various disciplines, serve and to lead at all levels of citizenship, communicate effectively, use information wisely and pursue a healthy lifestyle.  

A complete list of the Undergraduate Core at Doane University can be located in the catalog.  

Community and Identity (3 credits)

History of the United States I (HIS 205)

A survey of the American colonial and U.S. national experience prior to 1877. This course is designed for the general student with emphasis on politics and society. Students successfully completing this course will demonstrate knowledge of the major themes and chronological periods of American history. They will also demonstrate a deeper understanding of historical method, and the role of interpretation and perspective in constructing historical narratives.

History of the United States II (HIS 206)

A survey of the U.S. national experience since 1865. This course is designed for the general student with emphasis on politics and society. Students successfully completing this course will demonstrate knowledge of the major themes and chronological periods of American history. They will also demonstrate a deeper understanding of historical method, and the role of interpretation and perspective in constructing historical narratives.

American Politics (PSI 101)

An analysis of American political institutions and behavior.

Introduction to Psychology (PSY 117)

An introduction to the systematic study of human cognition, emotion, and behavior with an emphasis on the scientific method. Fundamentals of behavior, learning, conditioning, development, cognitive processes, perception, emotion, personality, and psychopathology are among the content areas studied. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of the scientific method for the study of human nature. Students successfully completing the course will demonstrate a general understanding of the knowledge established in these areas, as well as the methods used by psychologists to acquire that knowledge.

 

Mathematical Reasoning (3 credits)

Precalculus: College Algebra with Trigonometry (MTH 125)

Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra or permission. A study of topics in algebra and trigonometry that are used in calculus. Topics include functions, advanced algebra, logarithmic and exponential functions, and trigonometry. Students who successfully complete this course will have the mathematics background needed to study calculus.

 

Rhetorical Communication (3 credits)

English Composition I: The Writing Seminar (ENG 101)

Prerequisite: The student must demonstrate adequate basic skills before enrolling in ENG 101 or ACT English score of 19.  A writing intensive course designed to enhance the quality of critical thinking and the knowledge of writing. A variety of texts are interpreted, and critical responses are written using one or more literary forms. The student increases breadth and depth of critical thinking and knowledge of writing.

 

Global and Cultural Context (3 credits)

Comparative Religions (PRE 115)

This course is designed as an introduction to the major religious traditions of our world. Attention will be paid to primary sources as well as secondary literature, as well as history, culture, and aesthetic issues. The student should, by completion of the course, be aware of the major tenets, aesthetic expressions, and lived practices in each tradition.

 

Scientific Perspectives (3 credits)

Courses to come.

 

Human Creativity (3 credits)

Two-Dimensional Design (ART 107)

A course which focuses on the fundamentals of visual composition and design theory. Students work in various media, exploring the visual potential of line, color, texture, pattern, light and shadow, and space. Students will be able to apply the principles and elements of design, to understand how these principles and elements interact, and to analyze and evaluate the quality of design and form.

Three-Dimensional Design (ART 110)

Study of three-dimensional design using various materials such as paper, wire, plaster, tape, clay, and cardboard. Students will be able to construct three-dimensional sculptures from various materials using the principles and elements of design.

 

In Search of Meaning and Values (3 credits)

Introduction to Literary Fiction (ENG 237)

This course introduces students to a range of fictional forms and narrative styles. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to identify major components of fiction and analyze their functions to reveal the texts’ explicit and implicit meanings. Moreover, students will be able to describe several historical developments in the short and long forms of fiction. Finally, students will be able to describe how fiction operates in the investigation and expression of the human search for meaning and values. 

Introduction to Bible (EIS-XXX)

Course description to come.

Students may select any course in each Foundational Area of Knowledge to fulfill the components of the undergraduate core.

Sophomore Year

Fall

Human Creativity

Spring

Global & Cultural Context

Junior Year

Fall

Community & Identity

Spring

Mathematical Reasoning

Senior Year

Fall

Rhetorical Communications

Spring

In Search of Meaning and Values

Total Credits:

18/33 Credits Completed

Community and Identity (3 credits)

History of the United States I (HIS 205)

A survey of the American colonial and U.S. national experience prior to 1877. This course is designed for the general student with emphasis on politics and society. Students successfully completing this course will demonstrate knowledge of the major themes and chronological periods of American history. They will also demonstrate a deeper understanding of historical method, and the role of interpretation and perspective in constructing historical narratives.

History of the United States II (HIS 206)

A survey of the U.S. national experience since 1865. This course is designed for the general student with emphasis on politics and society. Students successfully completing this course will demonstrate knowledge of the major themes and chronological periods of American history. They will also demonstrate a deeper understanding of historical method, and the role of interpretation and perspective in constructing historical narratives.

American Politics (PSI 101)

An analysis of American political institutions and behavior.

Introduction to Psychology (PSY 117)

An introduction to the systematic study of human cognition, emotion, and behavior with an emphasis on the scientific method. Fundamentals of behavior, learning, conditioning, development, cognitive processes, perception, emotion, personality, and psychopathology are among the content areas studied. Particular emphasis is placed on the use of the scientific method for the study of human nature. Students successfully completing the course will demonstrate a general understanding of the knowledge established in these areas, as well as the methods used by psychologists to acquire that knowledge.

 

Mathematical Reasoning (3 credits)

Precalculus: College Algebra with Trigonometry (MTH 125)

Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra or permission. A study of topics in algebra and trigonometry that are used in calculus. Topics include functions, advanced algebra, logarithmic and exponential functions, and trigonometry. Students who successfully complete this course will have the mathematics background needed to study calculus.

 

Rhetorical Communication (3 credits)

English Composition I: The Writing Seminar (ENG 101)

Prerequisite: The student must demonstrate adequate basic skills before enrolling in ENG 101 or ACT English score of 19.  A writing intensive course designed to enhance the quality of critical thinking and the knowledge of writing. A variety of texts are interpreted, and critical responses are written using one or more literary forms. The student increases breadth and depth of critical thinking and knowledge of writing.

 

Global and Cultural Context (3 credits)

Comparative Religions (PRE 115)

This course is designed as an introduction to the major religious traditions of our world. Attention will be paid to primary sources as well as secondary literature, as well as history, culture, and aesthetic issues. The student should, by completion of the course, be aware of the major tenets, aesthetic expressions, and lived practices in each tradition.

 

Scientific Perspectives (3 credits)

Courses to come.

 

Human Creativity (3 credits)

Two-Dimensional Design (ART 107)

A course which focuses on the fundamentals of visual composition and design theory. Students work in various media, exploring the visual potential of line, color, texture, pattern, light and shadow, and space. Students will be able to apply the principles and elements of design, to understand how these principles and elements interact, and to analyze and evaluate the quality of design and form.

Three-Dimensional Design (ART 110)

Study of three-dimensional design using various materials such as paper, wire, plaster, tape, clay, and cardboard. Students will be able to construct three-dimensional sculptures from various materials using the principles and elements of design.

 

In Search of Meaning and Values (3 credits)

Introduction to Literary Fiction (ENG 237)

This course introduces students to a range of fictional forms and narrative styles. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to identify major components of fiction and analyze their functions to reveal the texts’ explicit and implicit meanings. Moreover, students will be able to describe several historical developments in the short and long forms of fiction. Finally, students will be able to describe how fiction operates in the investigation and expression of the human search for meaning and values. 

Introduction to Bible (EIS-XXX)

Course description to come.

Students may select any course in each Foundational Area of Knowledge to fulfill the components of the undergraduate core.

Sophomore Year

Fall

Human Creativity

Spring

Global & Cultural Context

Junior Year

Fall

Community & Identity

Spring

Mathematical Reasoning

Senior Year

Fall

Rhetorical Communications

Spring

In Search of Meaning and Values

Total Credits:

18/33 Credits Completed