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2012 Interterms

General Information

ITM 118, Multicultural Education (Johnson-Farr & Wehrs)
ITM 134, Basketball Officiating (Hood)
ITM 155, Introduction to Engineering CAD (Plano Clark)
ITM 202/GER 371, Heimat (Reinkordt)
ITM 206, Discovering Spain (J. Johnson & Forester)
ITM 253, What's Your Problem?: Engaging Impasse (Diercks)
ITM 277, ROBOlympics (Engebretson)
ITM 293, Psychology of Evil (Pauwels)
ITM 300, Introduction to American Sign Language (Kay)

ITM 300 does not satisfy the Cultural Perspectives requirement of the Doane Plan.

ITM 317, Getting to Know the Lesser Antilles (Ferguson & Purdon)
ITM 319, Leading the Way to Change (Petr & Fennell)
ITM 346, Political Science Fiction (Hill)
ITM 364, Opera Scenes (Smith)
ITM 372, Actions Speak Louder Than Theory (Bossard)
ITM 375, Humans and Plants: The role plants play in human societies (Elder)
ITM 377, Let's Run a Radio Station! (Thomas)
ITM 384, A Namaste Experience (Kalbach & Cooper)
ITM 385, Career Exploration and Planning (Ersland)
ITM 387, Arts Are Basic, Methods in Aesthetic Education (Gill)
ITM 394, A Low Tech Guide to a Sound Mind and Body (Orsag)
ITM 402, Jazz Workshop (Baxter)
ITM 403, Jazz: History & Meaning (Clanton)
ITM 404, Children: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (Florendo)
ITM 405, W-Immigration Literature: Fact or Fiction (Hegler)
ITM 406, Women and Power (Hind)
ITM 407, "The Wire" (Monaghan)
ITM 408, Unnatural Disaster: Explore the Science (Sikich)
ITM 409, A Florida Keys and Everglades Adventure (Souchek)
ITM 410, Ceramic Tile Mural (Stearns)
ITM 411, Problem Solving and Programming Using Python (Wentworth)
ITM 412, Sushi Biology (Sandridge)
ITM 413, Writing for Television (J. Franklin)
ITM 414, Region V Kennedy Center ACTF Experience (McKercher & Stander)
ITM 415, Baseball History (Bjorling)
HIS/ITM 371, The Civil War and Reconstruction 1861-1877 (King)
CED 205, Introduction to Field Experience (Ersland)
Departmental Prefix 290, 390, 490, Directed Study
ITM/Departmental Prefix 421, Internship Experience


2012

ITM 118

MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION

M. JOHNSON-FARR & D. WEHRS

In this course, opportunities and information regarding diverse populations including race, ethnicity, religion, gender, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, and special needs will be explored.  There are in-class presentations and discussions and field trips to area schools and service agencies.  Learning opportunities will include in-class presentations, discussions, field trips to schools and area agencies as well as one Sunday activity.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will incorporate diversity and multiculturalism through 1) participating in relevant learning experiences for students with exceptionalities, 2) fostering attitudes supporting the development of community which values diversity, 3) analyzing curriculum for aspects of diversity/multicultural components, 4) adapting curriculum and instruction to meet the needs of all students 5) influencing diversity/multicultural awareness and appreciation throughout the curriculum.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will required to 1) attend and be actively involved in all class sessions, 2) write two papers following participation in two events, 3) complete selected readings out of class for in class sharing, 4) participate in one presentation on a diversity issue, 5) reflect on their learning journey at the conclusion of the course, 6) complete an alternative activity approved in advance by the instructor if there is a scheduling conflict with class events.

PREREQUISITE: Education major

TEXTS: Waiting for Superman

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: $100 for admission to sites and other activities

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m. (half and whole days)


ITM 134

BASKETBALL OFFICIATING

T. HOOD

This course will offer technical instruction and practical experi­ence with officiating organized basket­ball.  Discussion-lecture will be offered to familiarize the student with the national feder­ation rules, with appropriate officiating mechanics, and with acceptable positioning for officiating.  Students will also officiate organized scrimmages with critical comments to be offered by the instruc­tor.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an under­standing of the basketball rules; 2) be able to apply knowledge of the rules to various real and hypothetical situations; 3) gain an understanding of basketball officiating technique; 4) demon­strate proper officiat­ing technique in controlled scrim­mage settings.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class; 2) participate in daily discussion; 3) score a minimum amount of points from 15 quizzes and one major exam; 4) participate in basket­ball scrimmages; 5) officiate controlled basketball scrim­mages; 6) score a minimum amount of points from a practical exam of officiating a basketball scrimmage.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The N.S.A.A. Basketball Officiating Packet. Information for obtaining the packet will be available in the link, Registration Requirements/Application Form,@ on the Web site, www.nsaahome.org

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Officiating jersey, whistle, lanyard, and clean basketball shoes.

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 155

INTRODUCTION TO  ENGINEERING CAD

M. PLANO CLARK

This course will introduce students to basic 2D and 3D drawing tools using Computer Aided Design (CAD) packages. Emphasis will be on producing precise scaled drawings in a variety of subject design areas: mechanical, architectural, and scientific. Students will complete a portfolio using each of the software packages and will be required to complete one drawing project each day. Because of limited licenses, students will have to share the computers that are available for this course.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) develop a mechanical drafting vocabulary that will help them communicate with a fabricator in order to precisely produce an object; 2) learn to use CAD packages (Solidworks, Sketchup, and hopefully, AutoCAD); 3) learn to create, edit, and print 2D and 3D scale drawings of objects; 4) learn the basics of dimensioning a drawing so that the object can be produced in a machine shop.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

Pass/Fail: Students must complete all assigned drawing projects (3 major projects and approximately 12 small projects) and pass the final written exam.

Letter Grades: Students must complete all assigned drawing projects (3 major projects and approximately 12 small projects) and pass the final written exam. Grades will depend on detail of drawing projects and adherence to engineering standards. Engineering students wanting to transfer these credits must earn a "C" or above.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Modern Graphics Communications, 4/E Giesecke, Mitchell, Mitchell, Spencer, Dygdon, Novak, Lockhart, Hill & Goodman | ©2010 | Prentice Hall | Paper; 784 pp SolidWorks 09-10 Student Design Kit; SolidWorks | ©2010 | Prentice Hall | Access Code Card

GRADING SYSTEM: Student Option

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Software fee not to exceed $10

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


 

ITM 202/GER 371

HEIMAT (HOMELAND) - A FAMILY CHRONICLE

P. REINKORDT

A study of the interplay of family and national events in Germany from 1919 to 1982, as well as a student-generated study of the interplay of United States history with their own family's experience during that same period.  Students will explore issues such as the intrusion of world history on personal life, family dynamics - between husband and wife and children and parents/grandparents, social class, regional prejudices, and conflicts between rich and poor.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: The 15-hour film is the example from Germany, and comparing this with their own family chronicle, students may be able to understand that common world events can be viewed from a different cultural perspective.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend and participate actively in all classes; 2) do research on a time line of world events from 1919-1982, comparing these events to their own family history and the impact they had there; 3) write a research paper and enter research findings on an electronic Web conference board; 4) keep a journal; 5) take two examinations.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: Students need to do some or most of their family research before class instruction begins (ideally during Christmas break). Instructor will have a questionnaire available before Thanksgiving break. Local newspaper archives or the State Historical Society in Lincoln are sources for information.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Selections from history texts and library research, family records (if available), one fiction work from the time of 1919-1982 in Germany.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM  206

DISCOVERING SPAIN

MAY 2012

J. JOHNSON AND L. FORESTER

Discovering Spain is a 14-day tour of the major cities of Spain. The cities students will visit include those of Barcelona, Cordoba, Granada, Sevilla, Toledo, and Madrid.  Students will have organized tours of the highlights in each of the cities. 

Beginning the tour, students will fly to Barcelona where they will have a day excursion of the city.  The next day they will visit the Monastery de Montserrat, founded in the ninth century.  It is found on the highest peak in Catalonia.  The trip will continue down the Costa del Sol spending the night in Valencia.  In Valencia, a tour of the city is included with a visit to the cathedral.  Following this the trip will move to Granada where students will visit the Alhambra Palace and Generalife Gardens.  In the evening, they will visit the Gypsy Caves for dinner and flamenco dancing.  The next day the trip will proceed to Nerja and spend approximately two days on the beach on the Costa Del Sol.  After soaking up the sun, students will drive to Gibraltar, tour the rock and environs and then proceed to Sevilla.  In Sevilla, they will visit the third largest Cathedral in Europe, the Giralda Tower, the Barrio and the shopping street Sierpes.  In the afternoon, students may attend a bull fight. The next day the trip will proceed to Toledo via Cordoba stopping to visit the Mosque/Cathedral.  In Toledo, students will visit the Cathedral and the final battle site in the Spanish Civil War and museum.  Early the next morning the trip will move on to Madrid.  In Madrid, students will visit the Prado Art Museum, the Valley of the Fallen where the Spanish Dictator Franco is buried, and El Escorial a 16th century palace where the kings and queens of Spain are interred.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) gain a better understanding of the diversity found in the population of Spain and the history that has impacted this diversity; 2) learn about the history of Spain and its effects on the present day; 3) learn about the history of Spain including the Spanish royal families, the Civil War and present day Spain and its government; 3) explore the food, culture, art and architecture from across the centuries in Spain.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will required to 1) attend all pre-departure meetings; 2) complete all tours, seminars, and assignments; 3) abide by the conduct code for the trip; 4) keep a personal journal, which will be checked periodically by the instructors; 5) participate in daily seminars discussing their experiences; 6) to conduct one seminar on an aspect of Spain (prior to leaving, students will be assigned topics).

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXT:  Students will be assigned a topic to research prior to the trip about sights to be visited.  Presentation of the research will take place on the trip.  Each student will be required to get a travel guide to Spain.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $4,000. This covers all transportation, lodging, breakfast, dinners and all entrance fees included on the tour. Additional tours and souvenirs are the students' responsibility. In addition, there will be a minimal fee assessed for tips for the tour guides in the various spots.  This will be approximately $30 total.  No visa is needed for Spain.  Each student will be required to have a passport.

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 23, 2011.

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 253

WHAT'S YOUR PROBLEM? : ENGAGING IMPASSE

R. DIERCKS

Human conflict stirs strong emotional responses, personal connections, and reflections often resulting in impasse.  Addressing the many issues in society requires people to work together to develop solutions. Focusing on the theme of conflict and impasse, students will take part in collaborative inquiry to engage impasse on issues utilizing a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) approach. PBL is now used in medical education, schools of engineering, teacher education, and many other areas to prepare graduates and undergraduates to be able to solve the same kind of ill-structured problems students will face once they enter the workforce.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) work collaboratively and independently to explore and define emotional intelligence, 2) develop plans for improving emotional intelligence in social interactions, 3) identify characteristics of effective group work, 4) apply the concepts of social-emotional intelligence to relationships and workplace settings, 5) synthesize information from across content areas to develop best solutions to chosen problems, 6) collaboratively construct additional objectives for the course that address particular problems of interest for their groups.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will collaboratively determine some objectives for the course. In an effort to integrate the instructor's expectations, the following objectives are provided:  Students will 1) explore a topic of interest related to conflict, 2) develop skills to engage impasse and solve problems using the Problem-Based Learning process, 3) synthesize information from across the content areas to address specific problems, 4) explore how technology can serve as a resource tool to help solve problems, 5) develop leadership skills to work with small groups.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The professor and students will provide copies of professional and educational resources related to the skills of engaging impasse and the particular issues explored by the students.

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Any travel costs students might incur to research a given issue they have selected.

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 277

ROBOlympics

A. ENGEBRETSON

In this course, students will work in teams to design, build, and program simple robots, using Lego Mindstorms robotics kits.  Students will experiment with robotic motion, behavior programming, sensors, and vision.  Students will construct pre-designed "training" robots, then use their experience to design, build, and program machines of their own creation.  The course will culminate in a ROBOlympics where teams of students pit their final robot designs against each other.  Students will document their designs, using the written word, digital photography, and digital video media, to produce Web-based documentation of their final robots.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will achieve a basic understanding of the various elements of robotics, for example, the physical components required, methods of movement, sensor techniques, and behavior programming.  Students will also gain experience in scientific documentation, through the documentation of their designs.  The documentation work will also expose students to aspects of Web page development.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class, 2) in teams, build working instances of the training robots, 3)  in teams, design, build, and program original robots to participate in the ROBOlympics, 4) produce step-by-step, Web-based documentation detailing the construction and operation of their final robot designs.

PREREQUISITE: None.  No prior experience with robots or programming is necessary!

TEXTS: Handouts provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 293

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EVIL

B. PAUWELS

Using primarily a psychological perspective, this course will investigate the various factors that contribute to instances of human cruelty and brutality. Through readings, videos, and class discussion, students will study the human tendency to think in terms of Agood vs. evil,@ and critically examine the validity, usefulness, and consequences of such thinking. Topics such as terrorism, interracial violence, organized crime, serial killers, and war will be addressed.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an understanding of some of the basic psychological mechanisms behind the behavior of both victims and perpetrators of violence; 2) be able to effectively articulate the advantages and disadvantages of categorizing human behaviors/events as Agood" or Aevil@; 3) gain an understanding of the factors that influence individuals= beliefs about whether others are Agood@ or Aevil.@

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) actively participate in class discussion; 2) successfully complete several short assignments and/or quizzes based on assigned readings; 3) successfully complete one examination.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Baumeister, Roy (1999). Evil: Inside Human Violence and Cruelty. New York: W.H. Freeman and Co. (paperback version).  This primary text will be supplemented with additional assigned readings that will be made available to students through the college library.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 300

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

T. KAY

This class is designed to teach individuals how to communicate with the deaf.  Emphasis is placed on the following communications modes: gestures, finger spelling, and sign language. 

This course does not satisfy the Cultural Perspectives requirement of the Doane Plan.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will be able to 1) define modes of communication; 2) read finger spelling; 3) sign before the class; 4) demonstrate the proper formation of letters and signs.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class and participate in small groups; 2) sign sentences and short stories in class; 3) complete written assignment on American Sign Language or a biographical sketch of a deaf person; 4) take three quizzes; 5) read sign language from video tapes.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: A Basic Course in American Sign Language by Tom Humphries, Carol Padden, and Terrence J. O'Rouke

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 317

GETTING TO KNOW THE LESSER ANTILLES

JANUARY 2012

D. FERGUSON AND L. PURDON

"Getting to Know the Lesser Antilles" consists of travel to and through the eastern and southern Caribbean (the Leewards, the Windwards, the Grenadines, and the ABCs) aboard Holland America's Maasdam for the purpose of visiting eight island nations to understand how geology and geography have played a crucial role in their respective histories and cultures.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Through firsthand experience of island geology and geography, and people and culture, students will determine why each of the four groups of Lesser Antilles to be visited during the January tour has a distinctive history determining its present state as an island nation. Students will be given the opportunity to understand why the Leeward Islands St. Thomas, the most famous of the Virgins group, and St. Barts, the island Columbus named after his brother, were quickly abandoned by the Spanish to become sites of ongoing struggles between European Nations, as well as sea rovers and, later, pirates, staking their claims in the Caribbean. Students will also be invited to determine why the Windward Island of Martinique and the anomaly island of Barbados, also abandoned early by the Spanish only to become sites of later clashes between France and England, eventually enjoyed more peaceful-though more repressive-colonial rule than did other islands. In like manner, students will be challenged to understand why Grenada, the most famous Grenadine and once an entire island plantation itself, changed hands between the French and English many times before becoming an important outpost in the British West Indies. And, finally, students will be asked to offer conclusions why the Dutch, early slavers and a nation devoted to commercializing the fish industry, wrested control of the ABCs-the desert islands of Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao-from the Spanish. At the end of the twelfth day at sea, students will also enjoy the bonus experience of sailing northward through the Windward Passage, which will permit late-afternoon views of the Greater Antilles of Cuba and Hispaniola, and the opportunity to understand how this body of water played a crucial role in the discovery and conquest of the New World.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students are required to attend all pre-departure meetings. Students will be required to keep a daily journal, electronic or paper, of their island experiences and any other related experiences they deem suitable for inclusion in the journal. Journals will be collected to be assessed on the eighth day at sea while sailing from Grenada to Bonaire, and again on the twelfth day while sailing northward from Aruba to the Bahamas. Students will also have to attend and participate in each evening's pre-dinner discussion/lecture as the ship sails between each island nation. Finally, students will be required to participate in at least two off-ship course-related morning tours-e.g., the walking tour on St. Thomas to visit Pissarro's birthplace and the Pissarro Museum, the trip to Bonaire's burro sanctuary, the trip to the sugar plantation on Barbados, etc.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXT:  Students will be given a folder of maps

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Approximately $2,250.

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 23, 2011.

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 319

LEADING THE WAY TO CHANGE

C. PETR & J. FENNELL

This interactive course provides students an opportunity to develop their personal leadership skills as well as advance their education on topics related to leadership, such as group dynamics, followership, group development, conflict, and leadership theory.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) enhance their knowledge of leadership theory, skills, and related issues; 2) practice various leadership models through group work; 3) consider specific examples of leadership and their effectiveness; 4) become familiar with various supplemental texts related to leadership.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all classes, 2) participate in all discussion and course activities, 3) write one 3-5 page paper, 4) give one group presentation, 5) complete daily assignments.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Northouse, P., Introduction to Leadership Concepts and Practice

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 346

POLITICAL SCIENCE FICTION

T. HILL

Speculative fiction is often dismissed as having little or nothing meaningful to say about politics, society, or the human condition. This attitude, however, ignores the many works of the genre which use futuristic or fantastic settings as metaphors to comment on the real world. In this class we will explore the politics present in a range of works of speculative fiction and discuss what they have to say about the world we inhabit. Source material may include, but is not limited to, novels, short stories, and films.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the class, students should demonstrate an ability to analyze fiction for its symbolic social and political content and should be able to communicate this analysis both orally and through writing.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to participate in class discussions, take a final examination, and write a final paper.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTSStarship Trooper by Robert A. Heinlein; The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. LeGoin; The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  2:00 p.m.


ITM 364

OPERA SCENES

H.J. SMITH AND D. BRECKBILL, ACCOMPANIST

In this course, students will study and prepare excerpts from the operatic repertoire.  Many great composers, both European (Mozart, Rossini, Wagner, Verdi, and Puccini) and American (Menotti), specialized in the field of opera.  In the college setting, singers primarily perform opera excerpts in concert or recital.  This course will give students the opportunity to perform this music in a simplified version of its original context: staged as a dramatic scene.  By exploring the intricate connection between music and drama, students will develop a better understanding of the operatic art-form.  This course will culminate in a public performance of the prepared opera scenes near the end of Interterm. 

Although preparing opera scenes for performance will be the main focus of this course, it is open as well to any students interested in studying the process of staging opera, even if those students are not singers.  Any such students will be expected to observe rehearsals and to help in preparing the performance in other ways than singing, but will also have the opportunity to read about the process of opera production and to study video recordings of opera productions, permitting them to learn through comparison and evaluation the possibilities and pitfalls of preparing operas for dramatic presentation.

In addition to the solo and small ensemble scenes, there will be one or two "full chorus" scenes to allow for the involvement of less-experienced, non-soloistic singers. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) study, memorize, stage, and perform masterworks of the operatic repertoire; 2) participate in the technical ("backstage crew") aspects of opera production; 3) demonstrate consistent vocal technique and appropriate dramatic interpretation; 4) perform and provide peer evaluation for one another in a masters class environment.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend and participate in class everyday, 2) participate in final recital/concert, 3) watch assigned video excerpts and write brief responses, 4) read assigned text excerpts and write brief responses, 5) demonstrate through performance an understanding of consistent vocal production, 6) demonstrate through performance appropriate dramatic interpretation.

PREREQUISITE: 2010-11 or 2011-12 participation in either voice lessons or a Doane choral ensemble (or both) OR permission of the instructor.

TEXTS: Handouts provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


 

ITM 372

ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN THEORY

J. BOSSARD

Why are people worse off when they have more options to choose from?  Why are we happy to do some things only if we don't get paid?  Why would more safety features lead to more accidents?  In this class, students will explore why people sometimes make decisions that seem irrational and why some seemingly irrational behavior can have perfectly rational explanations.  Students will also examine the unintended consequences of policy and incentives.  Students will incorporate basic economic principles to describe how we predict people to behave and contrast that with how people actually behave.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will learn basic economic principles and apply them to human behavior and examine why and how people make decisions.  Students will also analyze how this affects resource allocation within society.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class, 2) participate in class discussion, 3) read the assigned readings, 4) complete 5 pop quizzes.  In addition, students will create and conduct an experiment to study whether or not people behave as predicted.  They will write a paper that summarizes their findings and applies basic economics to human behavior.  Students will present their paper to the class at the end of the term.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions by Dan Airely. The Upside of Irrationality: The Unexpected Benefits of Defying Logic at Work and at Home by Dan Ariely

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 375

HUMANS AND PLANTS: THE ROLE PLANTS PLAY IN HUMAN SOCIETIES

B. ELDER

Economic botany is the study of how plants and people interact.  It is an extremely broad discipline that incorporates anthropology, agriculture, and societies.  Students will examine the role plants have played in agriculture, hunting, food gathering, medicine, textiles, and recreation.  This class will look at how plants are used throughout cultures around the world and how the uses of these plants have brought cultures to war.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will gain an understanding of 1) the role of plants in human societies,  2) the history of plant use in agriculture, 3) the current impact of plant use on modern societies.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) give biweekly oral reports on subject material, 2) complete a project utilizing plants and plant materials, 3) take a final exam over material presented in class.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS:  None. Students will gather information from journals and Web sources for their presentations.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 377

LET'S RUN A RADIO STATION!

L. THOMAS

An exploration of, and immersive experience in, the planning, logistics and execution of running an FCC-licensed over-the-air radio station, Doane's KDNE.  Note:  This course is NOT available to students who have previously enrolled in ATV 131 (Radio Station) for credit or no credit or who have been in any way associated with KDNE in a management or staff position in the past.  It is designed for students who have no familiarity with operation of a broadcast facility.  Students will develop a plan to organize, manage, control, and execute programming on KDNE and will serve in the various management and staff (on-air) positions that they create.  In the process, they will learn FCC rules, the use of audio equipment and production software, music scheduling and automation software, development of program formats, and methods of serving the public including public service announcements, news, and public affairs programming.  They will be entirely responsible for running KDNE 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for the duration of the Interterm.  This does not mean that students must be on the air "live," or present at the station all during this period, but they must learn to control, program, and be responsible for the automation system that will run the station when they are not physically present.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students who successfully complete this course will have an understanding of the legal and ethical requirements of running a federally-licensed broadcast facility,  and of the social and political role of a legacy media organization in contemporary democracy; will be able to recognize problems in organization, leadership and planning, and devise solutions to such problems; and/or will be able to engage in successful written and vocal performance to a broadcast audience.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all class meetings, 2) take two exams (one on FCC rules and the other on equipment operation), 3) write a course- and self- evaluation paper based upon performance criteria developed consensually between instructor and students.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Students will be required to read FCC rules, specifically CFR 47, Parts 70-79, software instruction manuals, articles in broadcast trade papers, and the current version of the KDNE Operations Manual.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


 

ITM 384

A NAMASTE EXPERIENCE: TRAVEL SEMINAR AND SERVICE-LEARNING INTERTERM

MAY 2011

L. KALBACH & K. COOPER

This 14-day course is designed to blend numerous elements including off campus travel, service-learning, and interdisciplinary study.  Students will travel to several cities and villages in south India and will spend time experiencing the rich diversity of this region while exploring its many spiritual, cultural, and historical elements.  Students will spend time prior to the 14-day travel experience in several on-campus sessions preparing them for the richness and challenges of this travel course.  Key features of the course will include exposure to the great contradiction and contrast of India.  They will witness, side by side, the most contemporary expressions of technology and globalization along with the marginalization of the Dalits, (the Untouchables). Students will view the splendors of ancient architectural temples alongside dwellings handmade of mud.  As they work with the Indian people in their service-learning project, students will feel and appreciate the great welcoming heart of South India.  Students will leave India having worked in partnership with the villagers of Chengalpattu to build an open air school and return to the United States as members of a global learning community.

This course fulfills the multicultural education interterm requirement.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) be exposed to the religions and cultures of South India, 2) gain an understanding of the nature of hospitality and what it means to be honored for one's humanness, 3) engage in service-learning projects as a lens to understanding what it means to be in reciprocal human relationships, 4) explore firsthand the many layers and challenges of sustainable living and the threats to this world view posed by globalization, 4) will understand the struggles in Indian history while honoring the legacy of accomplishments of its people.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) participate in all pre-departure activities; 2) research the meditation traditions of the various religions that will be encountered in South India, 3) fully participate in daily activities, 4) prepare two, 15-minute morning devotions for possible use during the travel seminar, 5) complete assigned readings, 6) keep a daily journal, 7) write a 3-4 page paper, 8) student participation in these activities will be evaluated by faculty.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTMirrorwork:  50 Years of Indian Writing (with special emphasis on selected works by Narayan, Perera and Roy, Markandaya, Anand, Mistry, Ghosh and Seth, Nehru,  Ambedkar, and Chaudhari).  The Mahabharata, abridged by Chakravarthi Narasimhan, Columbia University Press, NY, 1997.  Selections from The Essential Writings of B. R. Ambedkar. (2002) Oxford University Press.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $2,295.

DEADLINES:  $200 deposit due in June or July 2011.  Monthly payments of $300 will start in August 2011.

Note:  Travel scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 385

CAREER EXPLORATION AND PLANNING

C. ERSLAND

 

This course will provide students with an introduction to career development theories and applications and offer opportunities for career exploration, planning, and job search skill development which will serve them throughout their work lives and expand their knowledge about career opportunities.  It will focus on increasing student understanding of career development theories and applications; enhancing student self-awareness and self-exploration; assessment of career and academic interests; and gaining an understanding of the world of work compatible with students' personality styles, skills, interests, abilities, and values. The course will consist of lectures, discussions, guest speakers, and group work.  Individual and group assignments/projects will be involved.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Student will 1) become aware of resources available to the career planning and job search process; 2) identify one's own personality type, skills, interests, goals, and values; 3) relate personal characteristics to potential occupational fields; 4) use a decision-making model to identify personal alternatives, consequences, and desirable outcomes; 5) develop a persuasive resume which reflects the above self-knowledge and decision-making; 6) learn to deal effectively with interview situations; 7) understand economic, political, cultural, and demographic influences on job availability; 8) be aware of current theories of career development and what they indicate about one's developmental status; 9) plan next steps in career decision-making or implementation; 10) become aware of what employers look for in potential employees and what it takes to be successful on the job.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend all class sessions and engage in class discussion, activities, and interactions; 2) complete assessment instruments and informational interview; 3) complete all assignments, scheduled presentations, and a final project.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTSCareer Exploration & Planning Student Manual

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None
 


ITM 387

ARTS ARE BASIC, METHODS IN AESTHETIC EDUCATION

R. GILL

In this course, students will explore how specific works of art become tools for learning across the curriculum. Course experiences will include extensive exploration of multiple intelligences, specific areas of curriculum preparation and the development, by each individual participant, of a guidebook/portfolio that will include curriculum writing and experiential learning through the arts.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will gain development of creativity, increased problem-solving skills, and intuitive assessments through experiential learning.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  The primary product that students will develop through this course will be a cumulative portfolio that will include: lesson plans,  journaling, arts discipline research, research and assessment of other programs using the arts as a teaching tool.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Text will include various writings by Howard Gardner, Maxine Greene, and Eric Booth.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 394

A LOW TECH GUIDE TO A SOUND MIND AND BODY

M. ORSAG

Inspired by the ancient Greek and Roman ideal of a sound mind in a sound body and powered by a spirit of friendly competition and a low-tech approach, this course will divide the 12-person class into three four-person teams that will move through a series of challenging brain-teasers and physical workouts that will incorporate sound physical training principles and help to build a wide range of analytical reasoning skills.  Certain challenges will blend both physical and mental problem solving.  The class will take two field trips to Omaha. Mental challenges will include: analytical matching, story puzzles, crosswords, sudoku, chess, logic games, and a debate-style challenge called "the Verbal Gladiator." Physical challenges may include: Bikram (hot) Yoga, Indoor Rock Climbing, Extreme Core Strength and Bodyweight Exercises, Weighted Exercises and Antagonist Muscle Training, Kettlebell and Cardio Training Routines, a Martial Arts introduction, and a final day of Restorative Techniques and Meditation. There will be a multicultural aspect to the course as well.  The routines employed (the cultural contexts will be explained) are drawn from a wide range of world cultures including: India, Japan, England, Russia, Israel, and the United States.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will master not only the various techniques involved, but will be offered the opportunity (on a daily basis) to make difficult comparative choices and pursue success-maximizing strategies in terms of mental acuity and physical/fitness and health.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Successful completion of the tasks - students will be quite challenged to both mind and body - and the completion of beginning and ending comment/question forms that will both reinforce content and have students draw broader lessons from their experiences.  Daily "after action" reviews of activities will guide students in objectively analyzing strengths and weaknesses and developing strategies to maximize performance.

PREREQUISITE:  Basic level of physical fitness/health and permission of instructor

TEXTS:  None

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $75 to cover the cost of field trips

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 402

JAZZ WORKSHOP

K. BAXTER

This course will examine the basic elements of jazz theory and composition from melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, and tone color perspectives focusing on distinctive styles of jazz. Promotes a better understanding of various jazz compositional styles, jazz composers, creative elements and abilities, melody writing, lyric writing, harmonic systems, rhythmic compositional devices, and jazz reharmonization techniques. The course will introduce the jazz applications/concepts: major and minor scales, intervals, triads, seventh chords, major scale modes, the blues scale, the blues, jazz rhythms, circle of fifths and modal tunes. Emphasis will be on applied theory and developing elementary jazz vocabulary through transcribing, scale arpeggio practice, and solo analysis.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will learn variations of form, building from the blues structure, creating a compelling chord progression, and melodic development, as well as working with motives, different meters, and modes. Focus will be on compositional techniques that help students create jazz tunes that have a balance of melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic appeal.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to complete daily assignments, take quizzes, participate in discussions, complete listening assignments, and complete a final project.

PREREQUISITE:  FAR 104

TEXTS:  Jazz Composition: Theory and Practice (Berklee Press) - Ted Pease

GRADING SYSTEM:  Student Option

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Cost of staff paper

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 403

JAZZ: HISTORY & MEANING

D. CLANTON

This course is designed as an exploration of the history of jazz as "America's Music."  Students will view the Ken Burns documentary Jazz, focus on how to listen to jazz fruitfully, and examine key recordings in an attempt to engage our country's earliest indigenous musical form.  Students will conclude the course by both reading Wynton Marsalis' book Moving to Higher Ground: How Jazz Can Change Your Life and discussing the state of jazz in the world today.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Upon successful completion of the course, students will have 1) developed an understanding of the history of jazz in America through readings, recordings, and documentary footage; 2) learned how to listen to jazz through understanding its formal components and engaging in practical listening exercises; and 3) developed their own view(s) of jazz, its history, and its impact through readings, in-class discussions, and independent research and listening.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend class punctually and participate in class discussions, 2) complete assigned readings prior to class, 3) participate in practical listening exercises in class, 4) complete three critical album reviews on albums we don't examine in class, and 5) either write a final paper or complete a research project.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Scott DeVeaux and Gary Giddins.  Jazz: Essential Listening.  New York & London: W.W. Norton, 2011.  Wynton Marsalis, with Geoffrey C. Ward.  Moving to Higher Ground: How Jazz Can Change Your Life.  New York: Random House, 2008. (Available in paperback or as an eBook on Kindle, Nook, or Kobo)

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Students may be required to download/purchase music

CLASS MEETING TIME:   9:00 a.m.


 

ITM 404

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

J. FLORENDO

"If a child starts Kindergarten behind, they most likely stay behind

for the rest of the time they're in school.

Nationally, almost 50% of kindergartners start school behind."

- Sharon Royers, Principal Indian Hill Elementary

 

"Business leaders across Nebraska should understand,

the first five years of a child's life plays an essential role in a state's economic growth."

- Jerry Warner, Farmers National

 

How do environments that young children live in today heavily influence the future of our society tomorrow?  As a future educator, future parent, future tax payer or someone interested in the future of society, this class will present information on environmental factors that impact young children;  so heavily influencing their development and in turn, the development of communities and society in general.

Students will study the impact of the early years -  how societal and economic influences greatly impact these years and how these years effect development with long term and life time consequences; ultimately, students will gain an understanding on how they can become advocates in order that all children have access to nourishing and quality environments which encourage healthy development and a healthy society.

The course will encompass both classroom and hands on experiences.   The class will integrate classroom meetings, speakers, and tour a variety of early childhood environments. In addition, students will interact with young children gaining confidence and skills, discovering firsthand the "Dos" and "Don'ts" of working with young children and deciphering between old wives tales as to what is good for children.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) gain an understanding of how the brain develops in the early years, forming the foundation for life and influencing the impact of healthy development; 2) develop an awareness on how young children's' development heavily influences individually and collectively on a long term basis; 3) apply information gained in the course through interaction with young children; 4) analyze environments for quality elements that promote healthy development; 5) create a platform that advocates access for healthy environments for all children.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend all classes, participate in small group discussions and group projects; 2) come prepared to all classes with reading assignments completed; 3) join in question and answer discussions with speakers; 4) attend all field trips; 5) spend a minimum of 8 hours working in a pre-planned environment with young children; 6) keep a journal reflecting on their daily experiences with a final journal at the end of the session summarizing their learning journey; 7) as a final project, students in groups will develop a platform that advocates access for healthy environments for all children and share this with an appropriate audience.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Jonathan Kozol. Amazing Grace: The Lives of Children and the Conscience of a Nation (1995); readings on Blackboard.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  $10 for field trip experiences

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.
 


ITM 405

W-IMMIGRATION LITERATURE: FACT OR FICTION

K. HEGLER

This course is designed to enhance the critical reading, critical thinking, and creative and persuasive writing skills for each student.  After reading and studying three novels about the immigration experience and other learning experiences, students will identify questions to investigate in recent news and non-fiction publications to evaluate the accuracy of the novels.  Students will develop alternative plots from critical points in each of the novels. The course is interdisciplinary with content from English, history, and sociology as central foci.  The novels provide opportunity to explore the contemporary facets of immigration reform.

This course satisfies an upper-level writing requirement. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) develop their skills as a writer when considering organization, word choice, sentence structure, content, presentation, student voice (originality), and conventions; 2) investigate current immigration policy and reform initiatives; 3) recognize and value the immigration experience in new ways and organize these values into their individual moral compass. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all class sessions; 2) read the three novels and assigned or self-selected non-fiction documents; 3) prepare a three page (1,200 to 1,500 words) creative writing paper which could serve as an epilog to the novel, or take the novel in a new direction from a mid-point by changing the actions of a single character; 4) be part of a team which investigates historical and current forces of immigration from the African continent, Haiti, and the Central America region and prepares a presentation for the class; 5) complete reading response guides prior to class discussions; 6) write a paper from the perspective of an immigrant or first-generation descendent which summarizes the major learning from the course.

Optional  Each student will work individually or be assigned a team of two or three persons.  The project is to interview a recent immigrant or immigrant family.  The interview process should include the first-generation immigrant to the United States and second generation if possible.  The team should present its project as a slide show.  As possible, it should include country of origin and map, perhaps showing route to USA, especially if the immigrant was in another country refugee camp for a period of time.  The report should include historical context information on the reason the individual/family left the country of origin and goals for establishing a new life in the USA.  It should include the immigrant's reflection of what was lost as a result of the immigration, and also what was gained.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Boyle, T. C. 1995. The Tortilla Curtain.  Penguin. Cleave, C. 2009. Little Bee. New York: Simon & Schuster Paperbacks. Danticat, E. 2004. The Dew Breaker. New York: Vintage Books.  Students also need to have the style manual used in LAR 101 or purchase a replacement:

Hacker, D., Sommers, N., Jehn, T., Rosenzweig, J. (2008). A pocket style manual (5th ed.). Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's.  Students are also expected to use on-line sources for current news and accurate historical summaries about immigration from countries in Africa and Central America.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None


ITM 406

WOMEN AND POWER

W. HIND

This course is designed to raise awareness of the lack of female representation in positions of power both in the United States and abroad.  The course will focus on examining the root causes of the inequity and help students develop an understanding of the resulting impact on women today.  The first week will be a historical look at women's lack of legal rights, the suffrage movement, and the three waves of feminism.  The second week will be an examination of women in positions of power (leadership) within the business context.  The final week will focus on women in positions of power (leadership) within the political context.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) gain an understanding of the historical roots and consequences of the women's movement; 2) gain an understanding of a clear, detailed, and current introduction to women's political representation across a wide range of countries and regions; 3) examine the role that women play in America's Fortune 500 companies as executive officers and directors; 4) gain an understanding of how "pipe-lines" to power operate and other theories regarding women's representation in positions of power.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  The evaluation of students' performance will be based on three examinations.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:
All 3 books can be found in the Doane Bookstore. 

  • Women and Politics: Paths to Power and Political Influence (2010), by Dolan, Decklan, and Sewers.
  • The Next Generation of Women Leaders (2010), by Rezvani
  • Through the Labyrinth:  The Truth About How Women Become Leaders (2007), by Eagly

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 407

"THE WIRE"

P. MONAGHAN

The Wire has been called the greatest television show ever made.  What makes the show so interesting is not only its complexity and intelligence, but also the fact that it constitutes a sustained indictment of a variety of contemporary American institutions, including public education, the police force, and the government (at the federal, state, and municipal levels).  In this class, students will watch all five seasons of The Wire.

A warning:  The Wire is not for the faint of heart.  It contains graphic violence, male and female nudity, and copious profanity.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will develop an understanding of the various indictments that The Wire makes against certain contemporary American institutions.  By analyzing these indictments, and various works written about the program, students will not only acquire a better understanding of whether and to what extent The Wire's representation of American society is accurate.  Students will also acquire a better understanding of whether and to what extent certain American institutions are in need of reform.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students are required to 1) attend all classes; each unexcused absence will be penalized one full letter grade; 2) watch all episodes of The Wire; 3) complete a series of quizzes designed to evaluate one's comprehension of what one has seen; 4) participate in class discussions; 5) write a short (4-5 page) final paper based upon the readings, discussions and episodes.  All required assignments must be completed in order for students to earn at least a passing grade for this course.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  The Wire:  Urban Decay and American Television, edited by Potter and Marshall, Continuum Press (available on Blackboard).

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 408

UNNATURAL DISASTERS: EXPLORE THE SCIENCE

S. SIKICH

This course will discuss the history and science behind selected chemical, radioactive, and bioactive man-made disasters of the last century, as well as potential man-made disasters.  Each disaster will be reviewed through the use of video, reading material, in-class and online discussions, lectures, and presentations.  This course will increase students' awareness of the science and potential dangers of large-scale projects to the environment and society. It introduces exciting ideas from headline news at the forefront of modern disasters as well as conventional historical aspects of science.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will learn the history of major man-made disasters as well as critically analyze the potential disasters through oral presentations that could result from today's projects.  They will examine some of the effects of man's progress on the environment, wildlife, and other humans.  Students will learn basic concepts in areas such as chemistry, environmental science, and biochemistry. The goal is to foster a common liberal arts experience, helping to close the gap between science and the humanities in the minds of students.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend class; 2) participate in class and online; 3) completed assigned reading with discussion questions; 4) give a final presentation:   PowerPoint presentation on a potential man-made disaster.  Presentation topics could be:  the TransCanada pipeline, various aging dams around the world, nuclear power plants near fault lines in the US, etc.  Students would have to do their own research on the topic they chose; so yes, it will require research beyond materials provided for in the course.  The presentation will cover:  What makes it a potential disaster (some description of the science would be talked about here)?  How severe would the effect of the disaster be to humans, wildlife, and the environment?  Are there any safeguards in place to prevent a disaster, etc?

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Assigned reading provided in class

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.
 


ITM 409

A FLORIDA KEYS AND EVERGLADES ADVENTURE

JANUARY 2012

R. SOUCHEK

Fly to Fort Lauderdale and begin exploring extraordinary places!  Skin dive a Florida Key coral reef, canoe and airboat in the Everglades, kayak the Keys, and discover the culture of Key West, Florida.  At Big Pine Key explore the marine environment at the Newfound Harbor Marine Institute.  Topics of discovery include coral reef diversity, reef fish behavior, and the impacts of humans on coral reefs and the Everglades.  Canoe and airboat a portion of the 2,300 square mile Everglades National Park.  It is one of the largest national parks and home to some of the most rare and endangered species in the United States.   At Key West explore Mallory Square, the Truman Winter White House and the Ernest Hemingway Home and Museum.  In Miami visit the Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden.  Spend a January interterm exploring and taking advantage of the warmth of sunny south Florida skies.  Who knows, you may meet a manatee.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) gain an understanding of marine organisms and the marine ecosystem, 2) learn the value of the Everglades habitat to wildlife, 3) investigate the impact humans have on marine and Everglades ecosystems, 4) become familiar with south Florida culture and history.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to complete a notebook, a journal, participate in all activities, and complete all readings, attend mandatory pre-trip meetings on campus.  Journals entries will be due and reviewed at the end of each week.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXT:  Handouts will be distributed during instruction at the Newfound Harbor Marine Institute.  This trip lasts two weeks so some instruction, with readings, will be provided pre- and post trip on campus.  This instruction will include handouts related to the geology, biology, and history of South Florida.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $2,750.00, which Covers all transportation, lodging, instruction, fees for scheduled attractions, and most meals.  Students are responsible for any incidentals and souvenirs.

DEADLINES: A $350.00 deposit required by May 12, 2011 or earlier.

Note:  Travel scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


 

ITM 410

CERAMIC TILE MURAL

E. STEARNS

Students will research historical handcrafted traditions in ceramic tiles and demonstrate what they have learned by creating a mural with tiles.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  The objective of this course is to develop technical and conceptual skills for ceramic tile making, using fundamental hand-building and mold-making techniques. All projects have historical and/or conceptual components and require research, planning, development of ideas, and good craftsmanship. Formal, historical, and conceptual components of architectural ceramics will be explored. Working in both two and three dimensions, flat tiles, low and high relief tiles will be created. In addition, projects will investigate how abstract and representational images and patterns can be designed across multiple pieces. Composition, rhythm and repetition will be a major focus.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students are required to 1) attend all classes, each unexcused absence will be penalized one full letter grade; 2) complete all readings and sketchbook assignments; 3) participate in discussions; 4) write a short (3-5 page) paper over the historical research.  All required assignments must be completed in order for students to earn at least a passing grade for this course.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Handmade Tiles: Designing, Making, Decorating by Frank Giorgini.  A Lark Ceramics Book

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  $50 for grout

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 411

PROBLEM SOLVING AND PROGRAMMING USING PYTHON

C. WENTWORTH

Everyone in the modern world uses computers.  How do these machines do what we want them to do?  The short, simple answer is that computers do what people tell them to do.  How do people tell computers what to do?  We do that using computer programs written in languages that computers understand. 

This course will help people with no programming experience learn to think in a way that allows a solution to a problem to be expressed in terms that a computer can understand.  We will learn to translate a problem solution into a computer language called Python.  Students will have many opportunities to practice translating problem solutions into Python programs.  They will develop an understanding of problem solving and computer programming using many class activities and exercises.

Python is an open-source language available for free for Windows, Linux/Unix, and Mac OS X.  It is an especially easy language for non-programmers to use as their first exposure to programming, yet it is powerful enough to be a favorite language used by scientists, engineers, Web developers, network administrators, and more.    Whether you simply wish to gain a better understanding of how computers work or add a useful programming language to your skill set, this course should be interesting, fun, and beneficial. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) be able to describe in general terms what computers do, 2) develop problem solving strategies that allow finding problem solutions that computers can understand, 3) learn the basic elements of the Python programming language, 4)

gain experience in writing Python programs that solve a specific problem.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend class and participate in all class activities, 2) read assignments from the textbook, 3) work out several programming exercises for homework, 4) take six quizzes.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Downey, Allen B. (2008). Think Python: How to Think Like a Computer Scientist. Needham: Green Tea Press.   This book is available on the web for no charge.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Student Option

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 412

SUSHI BIOLOGY

J. SANDRIDGE

Sushi has been trendy long enough to have become popular throughout the United States, yet many who enjoy it have little idea of what it actually is, how it came to be, and what goes into it.  Information about the culinary and cultural aspects of sushi is relatively easy to find, but the fact that the components of sushi were functional organisms and part of an ecosystem is easily overlooked.  This course will use sushi as a framework for examining the biodiversity that underlies the creation of a good meal.  No particular background in biology is needed, so this course is appropriate for anyone interested in more than just the taste of sushi.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  This course is intended to give students both a cultural and biological appreciation for sushi, particularly as presented in Japan and the United States.  Students will briefly examine sushi as cuisine, and then investigate how typical ingredients function as living things prior to being combined into a tasty morsel.  The conservation aspects of sushi production  will also be considered.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to attend all sessions, participate in discussions, read supplied materials, complete two quizzes, participate in one group presentation, and create a sushi recipe along with a biological narrative about the dish.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Readings provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 413

WRITING FOR TELEVISION

J. FRANKLIN

This class will teach students the artistic and technical aspects of writing a teleplay.  Upon studying the art of writing for television, students will learn how to tell a story in a chosen genre that will be written in teleplay format as a television pilot, the first episode of a series.  Students will workshop and write independently to construct their teleplays.  The final project will be a written thirty-minute teleplay that follows the storytelling dynamics of television and uses the traditional formatting of a teleplay. 

Writing a television series is a tough business.  Usually a team of writers works on a series to make the weekly episodes.  But every series starts with one idea, the pilot.  A television pilot is the first episode of a series that serves as a ratings test for networks.  If a pilot is deemed worthy, more episodes will follow.  For this class students will learn how to write a pilot in teleplay format that follows the traditional aspects of writing for television.  The teleplay will be a thirty-minute episode that could potentially be the next big thing on TV.

The technical aspects of teleplay writing, including formatting, style, and story will be studied.  Genre, episodic storytelling, and all that goes into creating a television series such as character, scene, and story development will also be studied.  Students may write in any genre, be it comedic or dramatic.

The writing process will be intensive.  After an introduction to the teleplay writing process, work will begin on the teleplay.  During the course, small groups will workshop to develop the teleplay.  This means that in addition to writing the actual script, students will develop characters, back story, and possible plots for future episodes.  The bulk of the work, though, will be writing the teleplay itself. 

The writing workshops will provide the opportunity to share ideas and help one another develop stories and characters.  In the real world, a group effort is an essential part of the creative process, so a lot of emphasis is placed on other students' critiques of the work.

By the end of the course students will have a polished, revised thirty-minute teleplay as the final project.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will learn 1) how to analyze television pilots, 2) the dynamics of a television episode and series, 3) the technical aspects of writing a teleplay.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend class, 2) participate in workshops, 3) write a thirty-minute teleplay that will reflect the technical aspects of a television screen play that serves as a pilot episode.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Ellen Sander. The TV Writer's Workbook: A Creative Approach to Television Scripts

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades        

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  2:00 p.m.


ITM 414

THE LULLABY OF BROADWAY: HISTORY OF AMERICAN MUSICAL THEATRE

R. MCKERCHER & J. STANDER

In this project development and travel course, students will prepare and then participate in the regional Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival in Ames, Iowa. The active students will present in a variety of theatrical areas from acting, directing, stage management to playwriting, technical work, and design. Through regional and national festivals, KCACTF participants celebrate the creative process; see one another's work, and share experiences and insights within the community of theater artists. The KCACTF honors excellence of overall production and offers student artists' individual recognition through awards and scholarships in playwriting, acting, criticism, directing, and design. Since its inception, KCACTF has given more than 400,000 college theater students the opportunity to have their work critiqued, improve their dramatic skills and receive national recognition for excellence. More than 16 million theatergoers have attended approximately 10,000 festival productions nationwide. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will achieve a basic understanding of the various theatrical arts today through a study and active participation in the KCACTF whose stated goals are:

  • to encourage, recognize, and celebrate the finest and most diverse work produced in university and college theater programs;
  • to provide opportunities for participants to develop their theater skills and insight and achieve professionalism;
  • to improve the quality of college and university theater in America ;
  • to encourage colleges and universities to give distinguished productions of new plays, especially those written by students; the classics, revitalized or newly conceived; and experimental works.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend class; 2) attend all rehearsals and design/tech workshops; 3) produce an evening of performance and display for the Doane College community; and 4) in late January, attend the  regional festival showcasing the finest of each region's entered productions and offering a variety of activities, including workshops, symposia, and regional-level award programs.

PREREQUISITE:  Participation in a KCACTF category

TEXTS:  Script and other materials  provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  2:00 p.m.

 


ITM 415

BASEBALL HISTORY

S. BJORLING

The purpose of this course is to examine American baseball as a cultural reflection and catalyst in American life. While focusing upon players, teams, and events that are part of the game, the course integrates various related fields including immigration history, labor history, African-American history, industrialization, urbanization, labor unionism, and integration. From its origins as a children's game and spread as an adult activity in the mid-19th century; the emergence as full blown professional sport after the civil war; the formation of present league structures; the Black Sox scandal in 1919-20; the reconstitution of baseball's governance; the Babe Ruth dominated "golden age of the 1920's; the Great Depression to World War II; the post-war boom, slump, and the franchise migrations; major expansion in the 1960's; player-owner conflicts; good and bad times of the 1980's and 1990's; the "steroid era"; baseball's future.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students successfully completing this course should come away with a greater understanding of baseball history and the sports footprint on America and American culture.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS Students will be required to: 1) attend all classes; 2) actively participate in class discussions based on reading, video presentations, or lecture topics; 3) complete two 1000-word papers and three quizzes; 4) complete all required reading and video requirements.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Handouts provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


HIS 315/ITM 371

THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION

T. KING

Examines the causes, character, and consequences of two great American tragedies: the Civil War and Reconstruction, from the mid-19th century to 1877. Students who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge about the failure of antebellum political mechanisms, the growth of sectionalism, justifications for and against secession, and the methods and implications of war.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an understanding of the causes and the results of the Civil War and the reconstruction that followed the war; 2) increase their knowledge and understanding of the Civil War in general, and key historical events and personalities in particular; 3) increase their ability to evaluate ideas and arguments critically, to weigh historical evidence, and to draw conclusions; 4) improve their ability to communicate ideas and arguments concisely, accurately, and informatively orally and in writing.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) watch and prepare various critiques on issues discussed in the video series and the readings; 2) research and make an oral presentation of a key figure or key battle during the Civil War; 3) participate and lead in daily discussions about the video series; 4) attend all class sessions.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The Civil War: The complete text of the bestselling narrative history of the Civil War--based on the celebrated PBS television series (Paperback) by Geoffrey C. Ward (Author), Kenneth Burns (Author), Richard Burns (Author)

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

 


CED 205 for 0 credits is available to students who are enrolled in an on-campus 3-hour Interterm course.

 

CED 205-1 and CED 205-2

INTRODUCTION TO FIELD EXPERIENCE (0)

C. ERSLAND

An introduction to the field experience. Concerned with 1) helping the student prepare for, initiate, and select the field placement; 2) preparing the learning contract; and 3) understanding/dealing with issues associated with the field experience.

Through the field experience (internship) students apply knowledge acquired from formal coursework and integrate experiential learning.  This process should result in a better understanding between the two and move the student from being an observer of fieldwork to participant.  Course content will focus on career exploration, job search skills (résumé and cover letter preparation, interviewing techniques, researching industries/companies, agencies), and internship guidelines and procedures.  The student will prepare for a field placement for a future semester (frequently internships are filled 3-5 months in advance). Advanced planning by the student is imperative - DO NOT wait until the semester starts to begin investigating possible internship sites!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) learn how to create and develop a résumé and cover letter to prepare for applying for internships; 2) learn about different types of interviews, interviewing strategies, preparing for the interview, and what to do after the interview; 3) conduct an interview with someone within a job or position of interest and write a paper.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend all four class sessions; 2) satisfactorily complete all assignments.

PREREQUISTE:  None

TEXTS: CED 205 Booklet

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  Two sections:  12:00 p.m. - 12:50 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m..  This class will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays, January 3, 5, 10, and 12 for a total of four sessions.


DEPARTMENTAL PREFIX 290, 390, 490

DIRECTED STUDY

An opportunity for supervised independent re­search in a specialized area based on the inter­est of the student.  Credits are to be applied toward degree pro­gram.  (Stu­dents must enroll in two ITM desig­nated courses during their four years at Doane.  A third interterm requirement may be met by enrolling in a departmentally-designat­ed course.)

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will learn to do indepen­dent research.

PREREQUISITE:  Permission of Instructor

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades


ITM/DEPARTMENTAL PREFIX 421

INTERNSHIP

Contact the Career Development office for more information.