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2009

ITM 118 MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION
M. JOHNSON-FARR & D. WEHRS

In this course, students are presented with information and opportunities to accept and affirm student populations with diversity according to race, ethnicity, religion, gender, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, or special needs.  There are in-class presentations and discussions and field trips to area schools and service agencies. Students will observe and participate in activities with K-12 students. The course will include activities on Sundays with alternatives for students unable to participate with the class.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will enhance their knowledge and understanding of multicultural issues in order to develop a conceptual framework for classroom practice.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will required to 1) attend and be actively involved in all class sessions; 2) complete selected readings out of class for in class sharing; 3) participate in one group presentation on a diversity issue; 4) write a series of reflective journals, 5) read and critique one literature piece; 6) complete an alternative activity approved in advance by the instructor if there is a scheduling conflict with class events.

PREREQUISITE: Education major
TEXTS: Assigned readings
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: $100 for admission to sites and other activities
CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m. (half and whole days)


ITM 123 EXPLORING ANCIENT EGYPT
E. HALLER

An overview of Ancient Egyptian culture with particular emphasis on art, literature, architecture, and social history.  While Ancient Egypt provides examples of idiosyncratic kinds of political and military leadership, the development of Egyptology itself provides more recent examples of scholarly and artistic leadership..

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) acquire a framework for an on-going enjoyment of Ancient Egypt; 2) become acquainted with hieroglyphs; 3) become familiar with the resources and methods for the study of Ancient Egypt; 4) understand the conventions of Ancient Egyptian art including those of the Amarna period, and Greco-Roman periods; 5)  understand the importance of the contributions of the artists and scientists who accompanied Napoleon's expedition to Egypt.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) pay note-taking attention to DVDs, CDs, and videocassettes; 2) bring a one-page response paper to each class meeting; 3) complete reading assignments; 4) play senet at least three times; 4) present reports; 5) complete several short creative writing assignments; 6) learn to write their names and descriptions of themselves in hieroglyphs; 7) write a final essay.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Description de l'Egypte.  Condensed Tashen anniversary edition of the multi-volume publication by the artists and scientists who traveled to Egypt with Napoleon's expedition; Tom Hare. ReMembering Osiris: Number, Gender, and Word in Ancient Egyptian Representational Systems.  Stanford, California: Stanford U P, 1999; Barry J. Kemp.  Ancient Egypt: Anatomy of a Civilization. 1989; rpt. New York: Routledge, 1993; Naguib Mahfouz.  Akhenaten: Dweller in TruthA Novel.  Trans., Tagreid Abu-Hassabo.  1985 (date of the novel published in Arabic).  This translation was first published in paperback by The American University in Cairo P, Egypt, 1998; rpt. New York: Anchor, 2000; Joyce Tyldesley.  Hatshepsut: The Female Pharaoh. Viking, 1996; rpt. Penguin 1998; Joyce Tyldesley.  Nefertiti: Egypt's Sun Queen.  Rev. ed. Penguin Books: 2005; Norma Jean Katan.  Hieroglyphs: The Writing of Ancient Egypt. British Museum Publications Ltd. Rev. ed.  1985.
GRADING SYSTEM: Student Option
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 137 CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY
R. PETERS

This course is designed to expose students to controversial issues in the field of psychology.  The class will cover such topics as parapsychology, near-death experiences, UFO abductions, hypnosis, subliminal perception, pornography, repressed memories, interracial relationships, gender issues, human sexuality, institutionalization, and the insanity defense.

Instructional procedures will include lectures, videos, and class activities.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) become familiar with controversial issues in psychology; 2) learn how to deal with conflicting viewpoints and inconsistent data; 3) learn how to argue effectively by using various sources to support their position; 4) learn to appreciate differing opinions and perspec­tives.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class regularly; 2) participate in class activities; 3) take seven mini-exams; 4) read an assigned text as well as several additional articles.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Slife, B. (2007). Taking sides: Clashing views on con­tro­versial psychological issues.  Guilford, Connecticut: McGraw-Hill Dushkin Publishing Group, Inc.
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 194 NUTRITION AND SPORT
D. DUNNIGAN

This course is designed to give the student an overview of general nutritional and show how the needs of special populations will differ from the needs of the general population. Topics to be covered will include dietary supplements and ergogenic aids, nutritional quackery, and research and experimental methodology as they apply to nutritional claims, body composition, and weight maintenance.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will demonstrate competencies in general nutritional needs, dietary analysis, nutritional needs of special populations, nutritional supplementation, analysis of nutritional research findings, and alteration of body composition.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class; 2) participate in class discussions; 3) satisfactorily complete all written assignments, tests, quizzes, and projects.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: To be determined
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 227 INTERPRETING THE UNKNOWN: MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCES IN THE 20TH CENTURY
M. ORSAG

"Interpreting the Unknown" will indeed be a key part of this course. How people depict or explain a mysterious event or social phenomenon often presents a revealing insight into their patterns of thought and understanding. You will be challenged not only to understand mysteries but also to pinpoint hidden questions or meanings that lurk both within the "unknowable" and within human responses to it. The course is organized into six units that are evenly split between factual and fictional disappearances. Unit titles are:  Women, Political Ideology, The Environment, The X-Files, Serial Killers, Future Doomsdays.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will use the phenomenon of disappearance to gain a better understanding of important 20th century trends.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class; 2) participate in class discussions; 3) take an analytical quiz; 4) complete a final project (7-10 page research paper or a group project/presentation).

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: None
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 243 THE ECONOMICS OF PROFESSIONAL SPORTS
L. MANNS

In this course students will gain an appreciation for how economic analysis can enhance one's understanding of some of the issues raised in the following professional leagues: MLB, NFL, NBA, and NHL.  Several topics will be discussed including: monopolies, unions, strikes, league expansion and contraction, salary caps, revenue sharing, the reserve clause, free agency, taxes, stadium subsidies, sky boxes, TV revenue, and antitrust law.  It is probably fair to say that the United States today is a sports-crazed nation, especially when it comes to professional team sports.  Fan loyalty to teams seems to be alive and well; however, player loyalty to teams and franchise loyalty to cities has all but disappeared.  Fans complain that all the owners and players care about is money, yet there are some franchises whose very future is in question due to lack of money.  How did it come to this?  Who is to blame?  What can economics tell us?  Is there a viable solution to the economic problems of professional team sports?  These are some of the questions students will address in this course.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will acquire an understanding of the interrelationship between economics and many of the issues currently faced by the major professional leagues.  Specifically, students will 1) examine various economic issues that affect pro team sports, 2) apply relevant economic theory to the issue under consideration, 3) effectively analyze the impact of professional team sports in the economy, and 4) critique various recommendations for change.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class and participate in class discussion,  2) write one critical analysis paper (4+ pages),  3) take quizzes and a comprehensive final exam, and 4) participate in a salary renegotiation role play.

PREREQUISITE: None; however, either ECO 203 or 204 or 271 would be helpful.
TEXTS: Hard Ball: The Abuse of Power in Pro Team Sports by James Quirk and Rodney Fort, Princeton University Press, 1999; readings assigned by the instructor.
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 249 TIME TRAVEL
D. CLEVETTE

What makes for a good time travel story?  What are the implications for traveling into the past or future?  In this course students will explore the concepts, terminology, and theories concerning one of the more popular genres of science fiction.  Movies and short stories will be critically analyzed for their paradoxes and will be characterized through the use of temporal anomalies charts (time lines).

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  The student will critically analyze and explore the theories and themes of time travel in literature and entertainment.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) participate in all class discussion; 2) complete all reading and written assignments; and 3) complete a final project.

PREREQUISITE:  None
TEXTSThe Best Time Travel Stories of the 20th Century: Stories by Arthur C. Clark, Jack Finney, Joe Haldeman, Ursula K. Le Guin; supplemental readings.
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None
CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 250 COVERING THE INAUGURATION
JANUARY 2009
DAVID SWARTZLANDER

This interterm involves a sixteen-day trip to Washington, D.C. The course will introduce students to the historical, political and journalistic world of the nation's capital, culminating in student reporters covering the Inauguration of the next President of the United States. Students will tour Washington, D.C. newspapers and television stations. They also will research past presidents and inaugurations at the Library of Congress. They will meet and discuss issues with the Nebraska legislative delegation, representatives of the Washington Press Corps and possibly other national leaders. Students will file stories with newspapers in Nebraska and various radio and television outlets in the Lincoln area while in Washington. They will tour the Smithsonian Institute, the Washington and Lincoln memorials, historic Georgetown, and other D.C. attractions. A visit to the Pentagon and FBI Training Academy in Virginia may be included.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will learn 1) about professional opportunities in journalism, 2) the history and politics of the nation through hands-on experience, 3) how to write and videotape news stories and events for distribution to a mass audience, 4) how to shoot photojournalism assignments, 5) to research and interview government leaders, 6) the importance of meeting deadlines.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to participate in all activities, including but not limited to meeting in daily journalistic budget sessions, conducting interviews with political leaders, researching past inaugurations and writing news stories, shooting photos, broadcasting live on radio, providing Internet news coverage and/or videotaping television stories.

PREREQUISITE:  None.  Successful completion of JOU 113 and/or JOU 240 are strongly recommended.
TEXT:  None.  Research will be conducted at the site.  Students must have notebooks and pens or pencils to take notes.  Students with laptop computers are urged to bring them.  Students also are encouraged to bring digital cameras, digital audio recorders, and cell phones.
GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $1,400 (includes airfare, lodging, Metro pass and breakfast). Not included are lunch and supper, airport parking and spending money.
DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by October 3, 2008.

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 252 THE CULTURE OF FOOD AND DRINK
B. CLEMENT

In this course students will explore the history and relationship of microbes and food products. Topics covered will include the brewing of beer and wine, fermentation of foods such as yogurt, cheese, root beer, tofu, soy products, sauerkraut, vinegar, and others. Students will explore the chemical basis for the making of these foods and some of the specific organisms and their processes associated with particular foods. Some of the ethnic/cultural uses of these foods will also be covered. Field trips will be taken to a local brewery and vineyard, and a speaker from Food Sciences will be invited as appropriate.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will gain a greater appreciation of 1) the chemical reactions responsible for the production of specific groups of foods; 2) the organisms and their products that give the food its particular taste and texture; 3) the history and development of the use of microbes to produce food products; 4) ethnic and cultural aspects to the production of fermented foods; 5) the use of chemistry and microbes to generate popular alcoholic beverages.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) complete Blackboard quizzes and classroom assignments; 2) participate in classroom and field trip activities including a final poster presentation.

PREREQUISITE: None, although being of legal age to drink alcohol will allow the student to participate in tasting activities.
TEXTS: Handouts provided by the instructor or on reserve in the library
GRADING SYSTEM: Student Option
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: $10 for purchase of food and beverages for class activities
CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 300 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE
T. KAY

This class is designed to teach individuals how to communicate with the deaf.  Emphasis is placed on the following communications modes: gestures, finger spelling, and sign language. 

This course does not satisfy the Cultural Perspectives requirement of the Doane Plan.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will be able to 1) define modes of communication; 2) read finger spelling; 3) sign before the class; 4) demonstrate the proper formation of letters and signs.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class and participate in small groups; 2) sign sentences and short stories in class; 3) complete written assignment on American Sign Language or a biographical sketch of a deaf person; 4) take three quizzes; 5) read sign language from video tapes.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: A Basic Course in American Sign Language by Tom Humphries, Carol Padden, and Terrence J. O'Rouke
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 302 FAMILY IN FILM
D. DEBOER

This course focuses on the changing roles and definitions of family in film. Students will view films from multiple generations and genres to examine changing perceptions of family over time, with particular focus on gender role expectations in family.  Students will also be exposed to the diversity of family structure reflected in popular films. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will examine 1) the changing roles and definitions of family over time; 2) shifting gender role expectations as they pertain to family life; 3) changes in family structure that have occurred in the last 40 years.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) write critical assessments of each film viewed in class; 2) apply sociological concepts to explain each unique perception of family in film; 3) complete assigned readings before class; 4) attend class and participate in thoughtful discussions about each film. 

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Readings on reserve in the library
GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 306 PERSONALITY AND POWER: IMAGES OF ENGLISH AND BRITISH ROYALTY
K. JARVIS

This course will consider the reigns and personalities of selected English and British kings and queens between the 12th and 20th centuries.  Students will watch several feature length films and compare historical figures on the screen with historical accounts and biographical treatments of their lives. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will develop an understanding of the connections and disconnections between historical fact, biography, and contemporary film as it relates to monarchy through the examination of Henry II Henry V, Elizabeth I, Victoria, and Elizabeth II.  Analyses of the images of these monarchs during and after their lifetimes, and the contexts through which those images developed and changed, will allow students to develop a critical understanding of the role personality plays in the effectiveness of these leaders.  Brief attention will be paid the role England and later Great Britain played in global affairs during the reigns of each of these monarchs.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all classes; 2) complete all reading and writing assignments; 3) participate in discussions; 4) complete and present a group project; 5) complete a research paper based upon the readings, discussions and films.  All required assignments must be completed in order to pass the class.

PREREQUISITE:  None
TEXTS:  Walter L. Arnstein: Queen Victoria; Mike Ashley:  A Brief History of British Kings and Queen; Anne Somerset: Elizabeth I; Reading Packet: Students will be provided with a reading packet of primary and secondary sources appropriate to each historical period discussed.
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None
CLASS MEETING TIME:  2:00 p.m.


ITM 309 MULTICULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY
H. LAMBERT

This course will examine the role of culture in psychology.  Specifically, this course will explore the role of culture in explaining human behavior while examining the culture bias that is inherent in many of the psychological constructs and content areas of psychology.  Students will be challenged to gain an awareness of how their own cultural values and behaviors have been shaped and the role of culture in society.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) increase awareness of one's own culture and how it affects behavior; 2) recognize the role of culture and cultural bias in psychology; 3) gain an understanding of cultural practices while challenging the notion that psychological principles of human functioning are universal.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) read assigned material; 2) participate in all class discussion, activities, and projects; 3) complete written assignments and exams regarding course material.

PREREQUISITE:  None
TEXTS:  Matsumoto & Juang. (2008). Culture and Psychology, 4th edition.  Sager & Parker. (2008). Becoming Multiculturally Responsible on Campus.
GRADING SYSTEM:  Student Option
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None
CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 311 GHOSTS AND OTHER PSYCHIC PHENOMENON
D. MCCOWN

An exploration of historical beliefs in psychic phenomenon and the possible reality of ghosts.  Historical and fictional accounts will be examined in books, movies, and television.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will be 1) made aware of possibilities outside of our natural world; 2) invited to open their minds and broaden their intellect to allow for a curiosity of the world beyond our senses.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) read several treatises/books concerning psychic phenomenon; 2) give a presentation; 3) write a final paper.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Boye, Alan, (2003) A Guide to the Ghosts of Lincoln, Saltilllo Press.
GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: $5 for honoraria for speakers
CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 337 THE CARIBBEAN AND ITS CULTURE
JANUARY 2009
J. KOZISEK

Take time to travel and learn about the islands of the Caribbean as you cruise from port to port.  Students will become familiar with each island and the rich culture that surrounds it.  Multiple stops will be made as students cruise the Caribbean.  Time during the day will allow a visit to each island to soak up the local culture.  Evening seminars will be held to learn more about the islands and their culture.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  The student will become familiar with islands of the Caribbean and their culture.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) research an island prior to departure, 2) interview at least one person per island to gain information about the island's culture, 3) meet each evening for discussion, 4) keep a daily journal.

PREREQUISITE:  Age 21 and permission of the instructor
TEXT:  Handouts provided by the instructor
GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Approximately $2,400
DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by October 3, 2008

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 343 TEACHING IN THAILAND
JANUARY 2009
L. FORESTER & R. DUDLEY

Teaching in Thailand is a three-week experience in Bangkok, Thailand.  Students work daily in a Thai school teaching English to preschool and middle grades students.  Students are responsible for planning all lessons, working individually and in groups with Thai students, and participating in school related activities.  In addition to the teaching component of the interterm, students visit historical/religious (Buddhist) sites in and around Bangkok.  Students will also have the opportunity to travel to the beach communities of Hua Hin.  This course offers opportunities for the student to understand the culture of Thailand and explore the past and present of this fascinating country.

This course fulfills the multicultural requirement for Education.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) experience teaching ESL to Thai students; 2) broaden their global perspectives through exploration of Thai history, language, religion, and culture; 3) improve their teaching skill through planning and implementing activities to a non-English speaking audience; 4) have the opportunity to reflect on personal beliefs through participating in a cultural immersion program.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) complete the teaching component of the course; 2) participate in all activities; 3) keep a personal journal; 4) be responsible for one seminar (topics to be assigned prior to departure).

PREREQUISITE:  Education major
TEXT:  Readings and seminars (two) prior to leaving for Thailand
GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $2,950 (covers all transportation to Thailand and in Thailand, housing, and all meals but four dinners).  Students will be responsible for any incidentals, souvenirs, and the four dinners.
DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by October 3, 2008.

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 345 IMMIGRANT EXPERIENCE AND REFORM
K. HEGLER

This course is an examination of immigration practices through readings, films, and interviews with contemporary immigrants and professionals who serve them. The interdisciplinary content draws from history, sociology, political science and education.  Participants will explore these questions, among others: Why is immigration an  important issue to examine?  What are the forces that cause people to leave their homes? What happens to individuals and groups during and after immigration? How can citizens help immigrants survive and succeed in our complex society? What if immigration reform occurs?  In what ways are proposed strategies useful?

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) identify commonalities and differences among America's past and current immigrant groups; 2) identify strategies individuals and organizations use to support immigrants as they begin to understand their place in American mainstream culture; 3) enhance their understanding of the value of volunteer service and careers in service to immigrants; 4) gain an understanding of social, economic, political, and personal forces for immigration and immigration reform.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all class sessions and experiences; 2) complete required readings and give a presentation; 3) attend all class sessions and field trips; 4) complete one immigrant interview and summarize the interview in class; 5) complete a reflective paper; 6) participate in a team project to develop an immigration reform package.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Pipher, M. B. The Middle of Everywhere. (2002) and readings from Quinones, S. (2007) Antonio's gun and Delfino's dream: True tales of Mexican migration. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 356 AMERICAN HUMOR
B. JOHNSON

In addition to tracing some general origins of laughter and comedy, this course offers students the opportunity to explore several distinctly American forms of humor. From Native-American trickster tales to the public humiliation of American Idol contestants, Americans have utilized humor in unique and diverse ways.  American stereotypes of individuality and inventiveness have guided humorists from Mark Twain to Stephen Colbert.  By examining the social, psychological, political and literary uses of humor, we will begin to understand how humor has been used to transgress social boundaries and define the "American character."   

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By analyzing humorous essays, films, plays, and other art forms, students will be able to 1) identify and delineate several forms of American humor; 2) define the interdisciplinary nature of humor; 3) write short, critical reviews of drama and film, fiction and non-fiction. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: In addition to daily participation in class discussions, students will take two examinations, keep a journal of critical reviews, and write one longer essay. 

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Mirth of a Nation: The Best Contemporary Humor. Ed. Michael Rosen, 2007.  Online readings in Southwestern humor, etc.
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 357 DISCOVER BRAZIL AND THE AMAZON
MAY 2009
J. JOHNSON & L. FORESTER

Discovering Brazil and the Amazon is a 14-day tour of Brazil and the Amazon Region.  The cities of Rio de Janeiro, Manaus, Brasisila, and Salvador Bahia will be visited.  Students will explore the cities seeing points of interest in each such as the Christ the Redeemer Statue in Rio and the historical center of Salvador Bahia which is rich in historical monuments dating from the 17th century.  In Salvador students may visit the old market and the old section of the city, or bargain for handicrafts at the Mercado Modelo.  In Manaus, students may visit the old market which is fashioned after the Les Halles market of Paris or swim in the Negro River.

Manaus is the beginning point of the four-day Amazon excursion.  Students will take a boat up the river to Ariau Eco Resort.   Activities at the resort include taking a catwalk tour of the  jungle, visiting native villages/houses and canoeing up the Amazon.  A jungle hike, sunrise hike, and piranha fishing are also included.  All Amazon excursions will be accompanied by a trained Amazon guide. 

At the end of the tour students will take a flight to Iguassu Falls.  The falls, found in Iguassu National Park, are renowned for their beauty.  Students will have the opportunity to hike the area into the basin of the Devil's Gorge and take a train ride to the top of the falls exploring the Argentinean side of the falls.  They will then board open boats and "ride the (mild) rapids" to get a closer view of the falls. Students will return home from Iguassu Falls.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) gain a better understanding of the diversity found in the population of Brazil, 2) learn about the history of Brazil and its effects on present day Brazil, 3) learn about the ecological benefits of the Amazon region, 4) learn about the Amazon region including the flora and fauna, 5) learn jungle survival techniques.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will 1) complete all tours, seminars, and assignments; 2) abide by the conduct code for the trip; 3) keep a personal journal; 3) be required to conduct one seminar on an aspect of Brazil.

PREREQUISITE:  None
TEXT:  Students will be assigned a topic to research prior to the trip.
GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $3,800 to $4,000 (covers all transportation, lodging, meals in the Amazon and all breakfasts other days, and one tour each day).  Students will be responsible for lunch and dinner all days but when they are in the Amazon, additional tours, and souvenirs.
DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by October 3, 2008.

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 358 101 WAYS INSECTS BENEFIT YOUR LIFE
J. JURZENSKI

Insects are the most diverse and abundant animals on Earth.  They are often under-appreciated and outright disliked.  Presenting 101 ways that insects benefit individuals is just the tip of the iceberg in the relationships between entomology (the study of insects) and society.  It is important for students to understand the vital roles these charismatic organisms play in the environment, the economy, and their own life.  This course will focus on the economic effects, environmental importance, discoveries in scientific and medical research, art appreciation, and nutritional value of insects.  Students can expect to handle insects, conduct small experiments, and try their skills at ecological art or unconventional cuisine.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain knowledge of how insects benefit humans directly and indirectly, 2) develop an appreciation for several insects or insect groups, and 3) utilize critical thinking and problem-solving in evaluating scientific information about insects.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) actively participate in classroom discussion and activities each day, 2) complete a project utilizing insects in either art or food, 3) write a 4-5 page research paper on a select group of insects and topic provided by the instructor, 4) prepare and present in a group about various insect-related news, and 5) take a final exam over the material covered during class time.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Berenbaum, M.R. 2000.  Buzzwords: A Scientist Muses on Sex, Bugs, and Rock'n'Roll.  Joseph Henry Press, Washington, D.C.
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Students will be completing projects of their own design.  They will cover the expenses of these projects.
CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 359 GREECE & TURKEY
JANUARY 2009
V. KNOBEL AND J. VERTIN

This off-campus interterm will travel to the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas with visits to various cities, archeological sites, and museums in the countries of Greece and Turkey.  Students will have numerous hands-on experiences in places with historical, religious, artistic, and cultural significance.  The tour begins in Athens, viewing the architectural masterpieces of the Golden Age of Athens, including the Parthenon and the temple of Athena Nike as well as the temple of Zeus and the Panathenaic Stadium, where the first Olympic games were held.  Other overnight stays include the Grecian cities of Olympia, Nauplia, and Delphi where students will explore the largest suspended bridge in Europe, the Necropolis, the Epidaurus Theatre, and an archaeological site in Mycenae.  Also included is a one-day cruise of the islands of Aegina, Hydra, and Poros.  The tour then moves to Turkey, with a visit to Ephesus, the best-preserved ancient city in the world, as well as a trip to Troy which is famous for the legendary Trojan Horse.  Famous religious locations will include the Basilica of St. John, the Temple of Aphrodite, and Mt. Koressos (a popular place of pilgrimage for both Catholics and Muslims).  The interterm concludes in Istanbul, where students will visit the scene of Chariot Races (Hippodrome Square), the fourth largest church in the world (St. Sophia), and the Underground City.  Last-minute shopping can be done on the final day of the trip at the largest covered oriental shopping mall in the world (The Grand Bazaar), which has 4,400 different shops under one roof.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) experience the culture and traditions of Greece and Turkey, 2) learn history hands-on by visiting archaeological sites and museums, 3) examine similarities and differences in Islam and Christianity by comparing and contrasting customs, visual symbols and architecture.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend all pre-trip orientation meetings; 2) prior to leaving, research designated topic (or site), providing background information for a specific stop on the tour and using findings to create a document that will be put in the course notebook; 3) attend all scheduled activities as per the official itinerary, including morning breakfast where students will preview the day's events by presenting research findings of assigned cities (or sites); 4) journal daily in course notebook.

PREREQUISITE:  None
TEXT:  Course notebook to be compiled by students' research findings
GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $3,800 (covers all air and land travel, a one-day cruise and a private ferry from Samos to Kusadas, all rooms including two meals a day, all museum and archaeological site fees, and taxes).  Students will be responsible for the cost of lunch most days. 
DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by October 3, 2008.

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 360 MANAGEMENT AND THE ARTS
R. LAKE

This course teaches the fundamentals required for planning, operating and managing a nonprofit arts organization. The course will focus on the arts manager's duties and responsibilities.  Job opportunities and tasks will be explored in lower, middle and upper-level management in music, dance, theatre, opera, museums, arts and humanities councils, entertainment law, arts consulting firms, presenting and service organizations.  Students study current leadership skills necessary to effectively direct the organization to achieve a common purpose.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Through the course, the student will explore the steps in producing and managing an arts nonprofit organization. The student will 1) be knowledgeable about the variety of arts organizations and structures; 2) study successful mission and vision statements, a board of directors and their roles; 3) develop a mock arts company and business plans; 4) demonstrate basic understanding of fundraising and the National Endowment of the Arts; 5) understand arts legal obligations, contracts, by-laws; 6) hiring staff from job descriptions to skill sets; 7) obtaining property from purpose to production; 8) develop leadership skills to lead a successful organization and its operations.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) take one test (taken from text reading requirement); 2) complete in-class projects and exercises (projects range from writing mission statements, creating a fund raising event, writing a grant application, to creating a business budget and income and expense sheet, etc.); 3) participate in three field trips (Lied Center in Lincoln, Holland Center for the Performing Arts and Nebraska Arts Council); 4) develop mock organization and give a final presentation.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Management and the Arts, third edition by William Byrnes
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: $75 to cover the cost of field trips
CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.         


ITM 361 CHIMPS, CONDOMS, AND CONSPIRACIES: THE HISTORY, BIOLOGY, AND SOCIAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE HIV/AIDS PANDEMIC
K. MARLEY

Sometime in the 1930s, a chimpanzee hunter in the Democratic Republic of the Congo was exposed to chimp blood during the slaughter, became infected with a virus humans had never encountered before and the simmering epidemic got its tentative start.  Since infection could take ten or more years to manifest, the disease was difficult to track.  Even after it emerged onto a more developed medical landscape, understanding of this disease took decades and was hampered by conspiracy, fear, politics, religion, and money.  HIV is a virus like no other and has left a ragged scar on humanity whose depth we do not yet fully appreciate.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) learn the intriguing history of HIV/AIDS from Africa to the United States and back again; 2) study the current understanding of HIV infection and the manifestation of full-blown AIDS; 3) explore the social consequences of a disease that currently infects one in four people in South Africa and one in 300 people in the United States and that resists eradication due to the stigma associated with infection and the propensity of the virus to mutate. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will 1) write a paper on a facet of HIV/AIDS of personal interest and 2) individually or as a class engage in a service learning project involving HIV/AIDS.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: 28: Stories of AIDS in Africa by Stephanie Nolen; readings assigned by the instructor
GRADING SYSTEM: Student Option
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 362 MARTIAL ARTS AND SELF DEFENSE: HISTORY AND PRACTICE
M. MEYSENBURG

This course introduces the history and practice of various martial arts and self-defense techniques. There will be academic and physical components to the course.  Academically, students will survey different martial arts traditions.  Through a variety of media, students will be introduced to some of the many martial arts traditions that have been developed around the world. Students will work in teams to study and report on the history of one martial arts tradition.  Physically, students will learn fundamental martial arts and self-defense techniques.  Specifically, we will learn the first level material for Songahm Taekwondo, one of the most popular martial arts styles in the United States.  Self-defense techniques will include situational awareness, basic striking and kicking, releases, and rudimentary knife and gun defenses.  Strenuous physical activity and close contact with other students in the class will be required during the physical component of this class.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: In this course, students will 1) gain broad knowledge of many different martial arts styles, through video presentations and Internet research; 2) gain more in-depth knowledge of a particular martial arts style, through the preparation and presentation of a written report; 3) learn the basic stances, blocks, kicks, hand techniques, one-step sparring combinations, and form for the beginning level of Songahm Taekwondo; 4) learn basic, practical self-defense techniques.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all class sessions; 2) participate in class discussions based on video presentations of different martial arts styles; 3) in teams, research, prepare, and present a significant paper on a chosen martial arts style; 4) participate in the in-class martial arts and self-defense training sessions; 5) participate in a rank testing on the last day of class, where students will demonstrate their mastery of the basic Songahm Taekwondo and self-defense techniques.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Students will be required to perform research on the Internet, and/or through library readings.
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Each student should have access to a pair of open-fingered mixed-martial-arts gloves, like the kind used in the Doane PED 101 Kickboxing class. In addition, each student should have a moldable mouth guard for the self-defense drills.
CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 363 BLACK HILLS CLIMBING ADVENTURE
MAY 2009
MARK ORSAG

A physically and mentally-challenging interterm centered around the scenic Black Hills of South Dakota. This trip will feature five days of outdoor rock climbing that will culminate in long multi-pitch climbs in the Cathedral Spires area of Custer State Park and/or at Devil's Tower National Monument in Wyoming. Students will also climb the less demanding Harney Peak (the highest point east of the Rockies) as well as visiting other area landmarks such as the Badlands and Mt. Rushmore. The course will emphasize teamwork and will also include readings and discussions of climbing ethics and Black Hills history.

For those of you who haven't experienced it, technical rock climbing is a supremely challenging and invigorating experience. Balance, flexibility, mental toughness, overall body strength and awareness, endurance, and technique are all key components for the successful climber. Athleticism certainly helps, but the sport is also at least as much mental as physical. While the very best technical rock climbers in the world are still, for the most part, male, women often pick up the sport more rapidly (and naturally) than men. The sport is also, as we plan to enjoy it, quite safe. Your climbing education and experiences will be guided by the highly-skilled professionals of the Sylvan Rocks Climbing School and Guide Service of Custer, South Dakota.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Grading will encompass the entire trip and will emphasize being a supportive team player and overall contributor and displaying an understanding of both the ethics of the "vertical world" and an awareness of the Black Hills area's history (through group discussions and in other ways). The group's weakest climber/hiker could easily get a strong passing grade in the course by excelling on the other listed criteria.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) participate in all activities to the best of each person's abilities, 2) display safety and teamwork awareness on hikes and (particularly) on technical climbs, 3) contribute to group discussion.

PREREQUISITE:  Permission of the instructor
TEXTInto Thin Air (Jon Krakauer) or The Climb (Anatoli Boukreev and G. Weston DeWalt)
GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $1,260
DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by October 3, 2008.

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 364 OPERA SCENES
H.J. SMITH AND D. BRECKBILL, ACCOMPANIST

In this course, students will study and prepare excerpts from the masterworks of the operatic repertoire.  Many great European composers - Handel, Mozart, Rossini, Wagner, Verdi, and Puccini, to name a few - specialized in the field of opera.  In the college setting, singers, primarily perform opera excerpts in concert or recital.  This course will give students the opportunity to perform this music in a simplified version of its original contest: staged as a dramatic scene.  By exploring the intricate connection between music and drama, students will develop a better understanding of the operatic art-form.  This course will culminate in a public performance of the prepared opera scenes near the end of Interterm.  An encore performance early in the second term is anticipated.

Although preparing opera scenes for performance will be the main focus of this course, it is open as well to any students interested in studying the process of staging opera, even if those students are not singers.  Any such students will be expected to observe rehearsals and to help in preparing the performance in other ways than singing, but will also have the opportunity to read about the process of opera production and to study video recordings of opera productions, permitting them to learn through comparison and evaluation the possibilities and pitfalls of preparing operas for dramatic presentation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) study, memorize, stage, and perform masterworks of the operatic repertoire; 2) participate in the technical ("backstage crew") aspects of opera production; 3) demonstrate consistent vocal technique and appropriate dramatic interpretation; 4) perform and provide peer evaluation for one another in a master class environment.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend and participate in class everyday; 2) participate in final recital/concert; 3) watch assigned video excerpts and write brief responses; 4) read assigned text excerpts and write brief responses; 5) demonstrate through performance an understanding of consistent vocal production; 6) demonstrate through performance appropriate dramatic interpretation.

PREREQUISITE: 2007-08 or 2008-09 participation in either voice lessons or a Doane choral ensemble (or both) OR permission of the instructor.
TEXTS: Handouts provided by the instructor
GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 365 WETLAND RESTORATION AND HURRICANE IMPACTS
R. SOUCHEK

This course will involve travel by college van to the Galveston, Texas area to assist in recovery and rehabilitation in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike.  Participants will assist the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department with rehabilitation of Galveston Island State Park and other parts of the Galveston area as needed.   Students will also be introduced to the habitats and common marine organisms of the bays, beaches and near-shore waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) develop an understanding of the impact of hurricanes on Galveston-area communities and ecosystems 2) learn about the impact humans have on the marine ecosystem and 3) learn about the meteorological issues related to the development of this hurricane and its history.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) keep a journal; 2) participate in all activities; 3) complete all assigned readings.
PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Handouts provided by the instructor
GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $790

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 366 PHILOSOPHY THROUGH FILM
C. STRIBLEN

This course examines seven philosophical themes using classical philosophical readings and modern film.  The themes are: 1) knowledge and truth; 2) minds, bodies and persons; 3) ethics and moral responsibility; 4) philosophy, religion and the meaning of life; 5) social and political philosophy;  6) society, science and technology; 7) philosophy and critical thinking. A film accompanies and illustrates each theme, giving students a broad overview of issues in philosophy in an accessible format.  This course is an extension of the regular curriculum. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will be able to define and identify basic philosophical concepts including skepticism, dualism, consequentialism, existentialism, liberalism, alienation, and fallacy.  Students will be able to discuss, in both oral and written formats, the debates surrounding the philosophical themes and terms.  Students will also be able to construct their own arguments demonstrating the presence of philosophical themes in a film of their choosing.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class; 2) complete readings and reading response journals prior to class; 3) in teams of four, write a 6-page argumentative paper and give a 20 minute presentation demonstrating that a particular philosophical theme is present in a film of their choosing; 4) take a final exam.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Philosophy Through Film by Mary M. Litch.  Philosophy Goes to the Movies by Christopher Falzon.
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 367 DRUG WARS
N. VACCARO

The class will explore issues surrounding the international production and trafficking of illegal drugs and U.S. government efforts (law enforcement, diplomatic, and military) to fight the drug trade in foreign countries.  The course will approach the issue of international drug trafficking from multiple perspectives, involving attention to the history, politics, and social conditions of the countries involved, as well as an assessment of current U.S. foreign policy.

Approximately the first two-thirds of the class will focus on Latin America.  Students will begin by examining the narcotics industry in the Andean region (in particular, in Bolivia and Colombia), studying how the rise of the international cocaine trade has affected politics, society, and security in Latin America and discussing the goals and effects of U.S. counter-narcotics policy.  Students will then discuss the impact of drug trafficking on the U.S. border region with Mexico.  Finally, the class will examine the cultivation of heroin poppies in Afghanistan, the links between the drug trade and that country's internal conflict and the implications of those links for U.S. foreign policy and military efforts.

Class readings will be supplemented by the showing of films, both documentary and fictional, that illustrate the political, security, and humanitarian consequences of the illegal drug trade and of efforts to fight it.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) develop an understanding of the broader international significance of the issue of illegal drugs; 2) gain knowledge about the ways in which the consumption and trafficking of drugs in the United States can drastically affect, or even reshape, the politics and society of countries in which drugs are initially produced; 3) gain an understanding of the general impacts of globalization and the possible international ramification of U.S. domestic issues; 4) be able to make informed judgments on questions regarding United States' international anti-drug policies.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class; 2) participate in class discussions; 2) write approximately four short response papers; 3) write a final paper.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Drugs and Democracy in Latin America: The Impact of U.S. Policy (Coletta Youngers).  Opium Season: A Year on the Afghan Frontier (Joel Hafvenstein).
GRADING SYSTEM: Student Option
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 368 QUALITY IMPROVEMENT WORKSHOP: LEARNING TO USE THE BASIC TOOLS OF QUALITY
T. WIEDMAN

Though difficult to define, quality is important to us all; and mastering basic quality improvement techniques can provide benefits to people throughout their entire careers.  Fortunately, the basic tools used to improve quality are not difficult to learn.  Using a variety of videos, hands-on exercises, reading material, handouts, mini-projects, and class discussion, students will explore the concepts, methods, and tools that form the foundation for quality improvement programs worldwide.  These techniques can be used to help any type of organization improve almost any type of process.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: In this hands-on course, students will 1) explore the history and philosophy of quality improvement; 2) understand the sources and types of variation; 3) learn eight basic quality tools and find practical applications for their use; 4) learn to construct and interpret a basic control chart; 5) use multiple quality tools to understand different aspects of a single process and suggest strategies to improve that process.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all sessions and actively participate in hands-on class activities and discussions; 2) read all assigned material and complete short quizzes based upon the readings; 3) complete several hands-on mini-projects to gain experience in the use of the quality tools; 4) analyze simple data using a control chart and discuss the results of the analysis in a short, final paper.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Clark, Timothy J. (1999). Success Through Quality. Milwaukee: ASQ Quality Press.
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 369 THE SCIENCE AND THE FICTION OF SCI-FI MOVIES
H. YORK

Is there any science behind science-fiction movies? This course begins by offering students an overview of the scientific principles referred to in movies, including discussions of the basics of biology, chemistry, physics, and geology that are either closely or loosely followed in the plotlines of selected movies. Then students will work individually and in groups to evaluate movies critically, presenting their evaluations in written and oral format. The course is appropriate for students majoring in fields other than the sciences.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students successfully completing The Science and the Fiction of Sci-Fi Movies will be able to discuss the basics of the science commonly referred to in popular movies and recognize deviations from scientific reasoning and understanding. Writing assignments will require students to present their ideas clearly in short-essay format, and oral presentations will ask students to work effectively in groups to select a movie, teach classmates about the science specific to the selection, and clearly present the analysis of their movies during class.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) write four 3-5-page essays critically evaluating instructor-selected movies; 2) work with a group to give an oral presentation of a student-selected movie; 3) take quizzes based on lectures and required readings; 4) attend class and other required activities.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS:  Handouts provided by the instructor
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME:  2:00 p.m.


ITM 370 SHOW ME THE MONEY: THE BUSINESS OF SPORTS MARKETING
K. ZUMPFE

Many economists estimate that sports marketing is the tenth largest industry in the U.S.  This course will enable students to apply critical thinking skills to considering the impact sports play on our lives. From Pee Wees to the Big League, many of us are either playing or spectating.  Nearly all of us are purchasing. Whether it's a ticket to an event, a licensed t-shirt for a birthday present, or an entry fee, part of our income and time is spent on the sports industry.

During Interterm we will discuss such issues as: how to get more people to attend a sports event, how to sell more sports-related products, and how to use a sports platform as the foundation for marketing non-sports products.  In addition, we will explore concepts of sponsorships; ethics and the athlete; ethics and the participants; distribution, pricing, product and promotional decisions in sports marketing as well as emerging issues in sports marketing.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students successfully completing this course should be able to evaluate the elements necessary to create an effective sports marketing strategy.  In addition, they should have a better understanding of how to apply strategies and tactics within the sports marketing environment.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be 1) responsible for leading a minimum of two class discussions on current sports marketing issues of their choice; 2) required to attend all classes and fieldtrips; 3) responsible for analyzing numerous case studies and presenting or debating at least one.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: The Elusive Fan: Reinventing Sports in a Crowded Marketplace by Irving Rein, Philip Kotler, and Ben Shields
GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Approximately $10 to cover cost of fieldtrips
CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ACC 371 SELECTED TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING
K. SPRINGER

This course focuses primarily on the tax and financial accounting concepts/issues related to forming, operating, and terminating organizations operating as partnerships.  Time permitting, other current accounting issues/topics may also be discussed.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Upon successful completion of this course, students will recognize the ethical implications and understand the precise accounting (including tax) terminology and rules and procedures related to the formation, operation, and termination of the partnership form of organization.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) complete required reading; 2) complete daily homework assignments; 3) take two-three major exams; 4) prepare a partnership tax return; 5) complete other work as assigned.

PREREQUISITE: ACC 232 with a C- or higher, or permission
TEXTS: TBA
GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


CED 205 for 0 credits is available to students who are enrolled in an on-campus 3-hour Interterm course.CED 205-1 and CED 205-2
INTRODUCTION TO FIELD EXPERIENCE (0)
E. VAUGHN

An introduction to the field experience. Concerned with 1) helping the student prepare for, initiate, and select the field placement; 2) preparing the learning contract; and 3) understanding/dealing with issues associated with the field experience.

Through the field experience (internship) students apply knowledge acquired from formal coursework and integrate experiential learning.  This process should result in a better understanding between the two and move the student from being an observer of fieldwork to participant.  Course content will focus on career exploration, job search skills (résumé and cover letter preparation, interviewing techniques, researching industries/companies, agencies) and internship guidelines and procedures.  The student will prepare for a field placement for a future semester (frequently internships are filled 3-5 months in advance). Advanced planning by the student is imperative - DO NOT wait until the semester starts to begin investigating possible internship sites!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) learn how to create and develop a résumé and cover letter to prepare for applying for internships; 2) learn about different types of interviews, interviewing strategies, preparing for the interview, and what to do after the interview; 3) conduct an interview with someone within a job or position of interest and write a paper.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend all four class sessions; 2) satisfactorily complete all assignments.

PREREQUISTE:  None
TEXTS: CED 205 Booklet
GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None
CLASS MEETING TIME:  Two sections - 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m..  Class will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays beginning January 6 and ending January 15.


(DEPARTMENTAL PREFIX) 290, 390, 490
DIRECTED STUDY

An opportunity for supervised independent re­search in a specialized area based on the inter­est of the student.  Credits are to be applied toward degree pro­gram.  (Stu­dents must enroll in two ITM desig­nated courses during their four years at Doane.  A third interterm requirement may be met by enrolling in a departmentally-designat­ed course.)

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will learn to do indepen­dent research.
PREREQUISITE:  Permission of Instructor
GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

 


ITM/DEPARTMENTAL PREFIX 421
INTERNSHIP

Contact the Career Development office for more information.