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2011

ITM 118

MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION

M. JOHNSON-FARR & D. WEHRS

In this course, students are presented with information and opportunities to accept and affirm student populations with diversity according to race, ethnicity, religion, gender, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, or special needs.  There are in-class presentations and discussions and field trips to area schools and service agencies. Students will observe and participate in activities with K-12 students. The course will include activities on Sundays with alternatives for students unable to participate with the class.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will enhance their knowledge and understanding of multicultural issues in order to develop a conceptual framework for classroom practice.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend and be actively involved in all class sessions; 2) complete selected readings out of class for in class sharing; 3) participate in one group presentation on a diversity issue; 4) read and critique one literature piece; 5) complete an alternative activity approved in advance by the instructor if there is a scheduling conflict with class events.

PREREQUISITE: Education major

TEXTS: Assigned readings

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: $100 for admission to sites and other activities

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m. (half and whole days)


ITM 123

EXPLORING ANCIENT EGYPT

E. HALLER

An overview of Ancient Egyptian culture with particular emphasis on art, literature, architecture, and social history.  While Ancient Egypt provides examples of idiosyncratic kinds of political and military leadership, the development of Egyptology itself provides more recent examples of scholarly and artistic leadership.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) acquire a framework for an on-going enjoyment of Ancient Egypt, 2) become acquainted with hieroglyphs, 3) become familiar with the resources and methods for the study of Ancient Egypt, 4) understand the conventions of Ancient Egyptian art including those of the Amarna period, and Greco-Roman periods, 5) understand the importance of the contributions of the artists and scientists who accompanied Napoleon's expedition to Egypt.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) pay note-taking attention to DVDs, CDs, and videotapes; 2) bring a one-page response paper to each class meeting; 3) complete reading assignments; 4) play senet at least three times; 4) present reports.  For letter grades: an additional requirement of two tests.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Description de l'Egypte.  Condensed Tashen anniversary edition of the multi-volume publication by the artists and scientists who traveled to Egypt with Napoleon's expedition; Tom Hare. ReMembering Osiris: Number, Gender, and Word in Ancient Egyptian Representational Systems.  Stanford, California: Stanford U P, 1999; Barry J. Kemp.  Ancient Egypt: Anatomy of a Civilization. 1989; rpt. New York: Routledge, 1993; Naguib Mahfouz.  Akhenaten: Dweller in TruthA Novel.  Trans., Tagreid Abu-Hassabo.  1985 (date of the novel published in Arabic).  This translation was first published in paperback by The American University in Cairo P, Egypt, 1998; rpt. New York: Anchor, 2000; Joyce Tyldesley.  Hatshepsut: The Female Pharaoh. Viking, 1996; rpt. Penguin 1998; Joyce Tyldesley.  Nefertiti: Egypt's Sun Queen.  Rev. ed. Penguin Books: 2005; Norma Jean Katan.  Hieroglyphs: The Writing of Ancient Egypt. British Museum Publications Ltd. Rev. ed.  1985.

GRADING SYSTEM: Student Option

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 137

CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY

R. PETERS

This course is designed to expose students to controversial issues in the field of psychology.  The class will cover such topics as parapsychology, near-death experiences, UFO abductions, hypnosis, pornography, homosexuality, gender identity disorder, repressed memories, interracial relationships, transracial adoption, racism, infertility techniques,  institutionalization, and the insanity defense.

Instructional procedures will include discussion, lectures, and videos.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) become familiar with controversial issues in psychology, 2) learn how to deal with conflicting viewpoints and inconsistent data, 3) learn how to argue effectively by using various sources to support their position, 4) learn to appreciate differing opinions and perspec­tives.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class regularly, 2) participate in class discussions, 3) take seven mini-exams, 4) read an assigned text as well as several additional articles.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Slife, B. (2010). Taking sides: Clashing views on con­tro­versial psychological issues.  New York: McGraw-Hill

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


 

ITM 194

NUTRITION AND SPORT

D. DUNNIGAN

This course is designed to give the student an overview of general nutrition and show how the needs of special populations will differ from the needs of the general population. Topics to be covered will include dietary supplements and ergogenic aids, nutritional quackery, and research and experimental methodology as they apply to nutritional claims, body composition, and weight maintenance.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will demonstrate competencies in general nutritional needs, dietary analysis, nutritional needs of special populations, nutritional supplementation, analysis of nutritional research findings, and alteration of body composition.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class; 2) participate in class discussions; 3) satisfactorily complete all written assignments, tests, quizzes, and projects.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: To be determined

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 249

TIME TRAVEL

D. CLEVETTE

What makes for a good time travel story?  What are the implications for traveling into the past or future?  In this course students will explore the concepts, terminology, and theories concerning one of the more popular genres of science fiction.  Movies and short stories will be critically analyzed for their paradoxes and will be characterized through the use of temporal anomalies charts (timelines).

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Small group conversations will provide an opportunity to complete the required in-depth discussions of class subject material.  Daily written assignments and on-line discussion participation will improve student writing, communication, and their understanding of the material.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to participate in daily group conversations, watch movies in class and write daily reaction papers, read a short story each day, participate in daily on-line discussion about each story, and participate in a final class project.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTSThe Best Time Travel Stories of the 20th Century: Stories by Arthur C. Clark, Jack Finney, Joe Haldeman, Ursula K. Le Guin, H. Turtledove, M.H. Greenberg, Eds., Del Ray NY, 2005.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 252

THE CULTURE OF FOOD AND DRINK

B. CLEMENT

In this course, students will explore the history and relationship of microbes and food.  Topics covered will include the brewing of beer and wine, bread-making, fermentation of foods such as yogurt, cheese, tofu, chocolate, sauerkraut, and others.  Students will explore some of the basic chemistry of food and drink production and introduce some of the organisms and their processes associated with particular foods. Field trips to a local brewery, vineyard, and an organic farm/cheese-making operation are part of the course.  Significant tasting and some cooking will take place in the class.  Relevant ethnic/cultural uses of selected foods will also be covered.  As time permits, foods characteristic of selected geographic areas (such as Greek food) will be included.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: The students will gain a greater appreciation of 1) the microbes and their chemical reactions responsible for the taste, texture, and nutritional content of specific groups of foods; 2) quality and production of food using sustainable/organic techniques; 3) the history and development of the use of microbes to produce food products; 4) the use of chemistry and microbes to generate popular alcoholic beverages; 5) ethnic and cultural aspects to the production of fermented foods.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will 1) learn the fundamentals of fermentation, the process upon which many/most microbe-related foods are founded; 2) become familiar with the two main groups of organisms that are involved in food-related fermentation; 3) participate in classroom activities, including tasting and food preparation; 4) develop an appreciation for new/unfamiliar foods and a more discriminating palate for familiar/common foods; 5) complete a small group project that may be either a) an investigation of a topic in food or food production (such as the controversial use of antibiotics in animal feed), and includes a 3-5 page paper and a class presentation, b) read and present to the class a current book on a food-related topic (such as Dinner at the New Gene Café, by Bill Lamprecht), and write a 3-5 pp. review paper, or c) research the history and modern application of a specific food product (such as sauerkraut), including a 3-5 page paper, a class presentation, and demonstration of the food product.

PREREQUISITE: None (although having taken biology would be beneficial)

TEXTS: Each new food group will be introduced with a lecture and selected reading materials or Web sites.  When possible, readings will be placed on Blackboard or library reserve.

GRADING SYSTEM: Student Option

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: $20 to support purchase of cooking and tasting items.  Students should also be prepared to pay any costs of tasting (at vineyard or brewery, etc), and to show valid ID/proof of legal drinking age when requested. 

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 260

EQUAL DOES NOT MEAN THE SAME

F. DANIELS

Throughout history, the differences between men and women were distinguished by an inequality of the sexes with men customarily assuming a role of superiority. Now, in the rush to right clearly documented wrongs, the focus on equality may actually be blinding us to the differences that remain. Men and women are different, not just physically, but psychologically, and the failure to recognize and appreciate these differences can become a life-long source of disappointment, frustration, and failure. This course will take the opposite approach and focus on the fact that extremes, even absurdities, exist on both sides and that's okay. How they are interpreted and constructively addressed (at home and in the workplace) is what matters.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) learn to recognize (without judgment) the patterns of gender communication differences that can exist in 21st century American culture, 2) analyze and reflect on the perceived differences for better understanding and greater tolerance, 3) learn interactive skills to more effectively engage the opposite sex in both personal and professional relationships, 4) practice cross-gender communication through interactive exchanges.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) actively participate in class activities including small group discussion, non-threatening role-play, and a short topic presentation of interest; 2) read the user-friendly Alex & Elizabeth Lluch text and excerpts from supplementary readings in  preparation for discussion and activities; 3) keep a daily journal of ideas and questions; 4) conduct observations and informal experiments to test individual "theories" of differences; 5) develop personal strategies for improving communication with the opposite sex.  Additional graded requirement:  complete a 10-page research paper with a minimum of ten substantive sources (use APA, MLA, or Chicago style).

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Lluch, A. & E. (2010) The Ultimate Guide for Men & Women to Understand Each Other.  San Diego: WS Publishing Group.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Student Option

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  2:00 p.m.


ITM 274

GOTHIC: THE AESTHETICS OF FEAR IN LITERATURE, FILM AND POPULAR CULTURE

B. JOHNSON

Through the vehicles of literature, film, music, fashion, etc., students will explore various embodiments of "Gothic" expression. From the origins of the term in the Ancient and Medieval periods through Romantic Gothic, Victorian Gothic, and American Gothic, students will examine the manifestations and meanings of Gothic art forms.  In particular, the class will question why expressions of terror have had such appeal for readers/viewers over several centuries. The social, political, religious, sexual, and psychological undercurrents of the Gothic works under examination will provide access to the dark cultural anxieties that the Gothic addresses.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of the course, students will be able to identify Gothic forms and meanings as well as historical trends that have shaped them. Students will be able to apply several questions to each work: 1) How is fear generated? 2) What is the nature of that fear, and what emotions does it generate? 3) What does such fear signify in religious, psychological, political, and economic terms? Students will improve writing and critical thinking skills through film reviews, journal entries, and group reports.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) participate in class, 2) take quizzes and examinations, 3) keep a critical thinking journal, 4) participate in group reports.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus; Bram Stoker, Dracula; miscellaneous readings.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


 

ITM 277

ROBOlympics

J. VERTIN

In this course, students will work in teams to design, build, and program simple robots, using Lego Mindstorms robotics kits.  Students will experiment with robotic motion, behavior programming, sensors, and vision.  Students will construct pre-designed "training" robots, then use their experience to design, build, and program machines of their own creation.  The course will culminate in a ROBOlympics where teams of students pit their final robot designs against each other.  Students will document their designs, using the written word, digital photography, and digital video media, to produce Web-based documentation of their final robots.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will achieve a basic understanding of the various elements of robotics, for example, the physical components required, methods of movement, sensor techniques, and behavior programming.  Students will also gain experience in scientific documentation, through the documentation of their designs.  The documentation work will also expose students to aspects of Web page development.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class, 2) in teams, build working instances of the training robots, 3)  in teams, design, build and program original robots to participate in the ROBOlympics, 4) produce step-by-step, Web-based documentation detailing the construction and operation of their final robot designs.

PREREQUISITE: None.  No prior experience with robots or programming is necessary!

TEXTS: Handouts provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 300

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

T. KAY

This class is designed to teach individuals how to communicate with the deaf.  Emphasis is placed on the following communications modes: gestures, finger spelling, and sign language.

This course does not satisfy the Cultural Perspectives requirement of the Doane Plan.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will be able to 1) define modes of communication, 2) read finger spelling, 3) sign before the class, 4) demonstrate the proper formation of letters and signs.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class and participate in small groups, 2) sign sentences and short stories in class, 3) complete written assignment on American Sign Language or a biographical sketch of a deaf person, 4) take three quizzes, 5) read sign language from video tapes.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: A Basic Course in American Sign Language by Tom Humphries, Carol Padden, and Terrence J. O'Rouke

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 302

FAMILY IN FILM

D. DEBOER

This course focuses on the changing roles and definitions of family in film. Students will view films from multiple generations and genres to examine changing perceptions of family over time, with particular focus on gender role expectations in family.  Students will also be exposed to the diversity of family structure reflected in popular films.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will examine 1) the changing roles and definitions of family over time, 2) shifting gender role expectations as they pertain to family life, 3) changes in family structure that have occurred in the last 40 years.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) write critical assessments of each film viewed in class, 2) apply sociological concepts to explain each unique perception of family in film, 3) complete assigned readings before class, 4) attend class and participate in thoughtful discussions about each film. 

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Readings on reserve in the library

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


 

 

ITM 306

PERSONALITY AND POWER: IMAGES OF ENGLISH ROYALTY IN FILM AND HISTORY

K. JARVIS

This course will consider the reigns and personalities of selected English kings and queens between the 12th and 17th centuries.  Students will watch several feature-length films and documentaries and compare the treatment of historical figures on the screen with historical, biographical, and literary accounts of their lives and how their images have been utilized or changed over time. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will develop an understanding of the connections and disconnections between historical fact, biography, documentary, and contemporary film as they relate to monarchy through the examination of Henry II and his family, Henry V, Elizabeth I, Victoria, and Elizabeth II.  Analyses of the images of these monarchs during and after their lifetimes, and the contexts through which those images developed and changed will allow students to develop a critical understanding of the role personality played in the effectiveness of these leaders and how myth and memory continue to influence perceptions of their historical legacies.  Brief attention will be paid the role England and later Great Britain played in global affairs during the reigns of each of these monarchs.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all classes - each unexcused absence will be penalized one full letter grade; 2) complete all reading and writing assignments; 3) participate in discussions; 4) participate in the group project activities; 5) write a short (4-5 page) final paper based upon the readings, discussions and films.  All required assignments must be completed in order for students to earn at least a passing grade for this course.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Walter L. Arnstein: Queen Victoria; Mike Ashley:  A Brief History of British Kings and Queens; Alison Weir: The Life of Elizabeth I (2008 edition).  Blackboard readings, as assigned.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  2:00 p.m.


 

ITM 310

AFRICA EXPEDITION 2011

B. LEVITOV

MAY 2011

 

A three-week trip to Kenya and Tanzania, plus the island of Zanzibar.  The expedition begins in Kenya, with an overnight in the capital, Nairobi, the departure point for a three-day safari to the Masai Mara National Game Reserve, where we will see giraffes, elephants, zebras, and many other animals with wildlife guide Isaac Kinyanjui and wildlife photographer Paul McDougal. Following the safari, we will cross the equator along the Rift Valley to Ol'Ngarua , the home of Isaac Kinyanjui and family, for a unique opportunity to live in an African village and participate in family activities, such as shopping in the local markets, gathering vegetables in the farm, preparing and cooking meals. While at the village, we will visit Thompson Falls, schools, churches, orphanages, and farms, as well as the nearby towns of Karandi and Nyaharuru.  Following the village stay, we will travel to Hell's Gate National Park in the Rift Valley for a mountain bike trip into Hell's Gate gorge to see the beautiful cliffs and a wide variety of bird and animal life. We will spend a day in Nairobi for shopping, a city tour, and for visiting the Sheldrick Wildlife Center and the Kazuri bead craft center before we board the overnight train across Kenya to the coastal city of Mombasa. We will continue on a coastal route along the Indian Ocean to Tanzania's capital, Dar es Salaam. Our next adventure starts on the ferry to the legendary island of Zanzibar and the exotic city of Stone Town, with its fascinating labyrinth of narrow streets and Swahili architecture. Activities on Zanzibar include a spice tour, snorkeling, beaches, fishing villages, seeing the many famous carved wooden doors, visiting museums, tasting Swahili cuisine, and watching the dhows (ancient sailing ships) in the harbor. A ferry returns us to Dar es Salaam for our departure.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) read background materials on the history and culture of Kenya and Tanzania in order to appreciate the heritage as well as understand aspects of contemporary life; 2) study rudimentary Swahili, the language spoken in all of the areas of travel; 3) experience village life and participate in everyday family activities, 4) experience the differences of life and travel in non-western countries, 5) experience life in African cities and villages to appreciate Africa's cultural and artistic diversity, 6) experience Swahili culture and aspects of Arabic heritage.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) keep a daily journal; 2) complete assigned readings. These assignments will be discussed with the participating faculty member.

PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor.

TEXTS:  Lonely Planet Guidebooks to Kenya and Tanzania and handouts provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Approximately $2,900 (includes all transportation, accommodations, safaris, and excursions and some meals).  The total cost does not include: inoculations, anti-malaria medications, international student ID, passport, visas, food, optional additional travel insurance, tent, and sleeping bag.

DEADLINES: Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2010

Note: Travel scholarship monies apply to this interterm. Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


 

ITM 311

GHOSTS IN FACT AND FICTION

D. MCCOWN

Students will explore historical beliefs in the reality of the spirit world: i.e., Ghosts.  Fictional accounts will coincide with reality in books, films, and television.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will be 1) made aware of possibilities outside of our natural world, 2) invited to open their minds and broaden their intellect to allow for a curiosity of the world beyond our senses.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) read several treatises/books concerning psychic phenomenon, 2) view fictional accounts/films on this phenomenon, 3) write several reports and a final paper.

PREREQUISITE: None, other than an open mind and a sense of curiosity

TEXTS: Boye, Alan, A Guide to the Ghosts of Lincoln, 3rd ed., Saltilllo Press.

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 319

LEADING THE WAY TO CHANGE

C. PETR

This interactive course provides students an opportunity to develop their personal leadership skills as well as advance their education on topics related to leadership, such as group dynamics, followership, group development, conflict, and leadership theory.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) enhance their knowledge of leadership theory, skills, and related issues; 2) practice various leadership models through group work; 3) consider specific examples of leadership and their effectiveness; 4) become familiar with various supplemental texts related to leadership.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all classes, 2) participate in all discussion and course activities, 3) write one 3-5 page paper, 4) give one group presentation, 5) complete daily assignments.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Komives, S., Lucas N. and McMahon, T. Exploring Leadership For College Students Who Want to Make a Difference, Jossey-Bass Publishers, San Francisco, 1998.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


 

ITM 337

THE CARIBBEAN AND ITS CULTURE

JANUARY 2011

J. KOZISEK

Take time to travel and learn about the islands of the Caribbean as you cruise from port to port.  Students will become familiar with each island and the rich culture that surrounds it.  Multiple stops will be made as students cruise the Caribbean.  Time during the day will allow a visit to each island to soak up the local culture.  Evening seminars will be held to learn more about the islands and their culture.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  The student will become familiar with islands of the Caribbean and their culture.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) research an island prior to departure, 2) interview at least one person per island to gain information about the island's culture, 3) meet each evening for seminar discussions; faculty will evaluate student participation in the seminars, 4) keep a daily journal, which will be shared with faculty.

PREREQUISITE:  Age 21 and permission of the instructor

TEXT:  Handouts provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Approximately $2,400

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2010

Note:  Travel scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 343

TEACHING IN THAILAND

JANUARY 2011

L. FORESTER & R. DUDLEY

Teaching in Thailand is a three-week experience in Bangkok, Thailand.  Students work daily in a Thai school teaching English to preschool and middle grades students.  Students are responsible for planning all lessons, working individually and in groups with Thai students, and participating in school-related activities.  In addition to the teaching component of the interterm, students visit historical/religious (Buddhist) sites in and around Bangkok.  Students will also have the opportunity to travel to the beach community of Hua Hin.  This course offers opportunities for the student to understand the culture of Thailand and explore the past and present of this fascinating country.

This course fulfills the multicultural requirement for Education.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) experience teaching ESL to Thai students; 2) broaden their global perspectives through exploration of Thai history, language, religion, and culture; 3) improve their teaching skill through planning and implementing activities to a non-English speaking audience; 4) have the opportunity to reflect on personal beliefs through participating in a cultural immersion program.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) complete the teaching component of the course, which will be supervised by faculty, 2) participate in all activities, 3) keep a personal journal, 4) be responsible for one seminar (topics to be assigned prior to departure).

PREREQUISITE:  Education major or special permission

TEXT:  Readings and seminars (two) prior to leaving for Thailand

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $3,000 (covers all transportation to Thailand and in Thailand, housing, and all meals but four dinners).  Students will be responsible for any incidentals, souvenirs, and the four dinners.  (Cost depends on airfares next year.)

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2010.

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


 

 

ITM 361

CHIMPS, CONDOMS, AND CONSPIRACIES: THE HISTORY, BIOLOGY, AND SOCIAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE HIV/AIDS PANDEMIC

K. MARLEY

Sometime in the 1930s, a chimpanzee hunter in the Democratic Republic of the Congo was exposed to chimp blood during the slaughter, became infected with a virus humans had never encountered before, and the simmering epidemic got its tentative start.  Since infection could take ten or more years to manifest, the disease was difficult to track.  Even after it emerged onto a more developed medical landscape, understanding of this disease took decades and was hampered by conspiracy, fear, politics, religion, and money.  HIV is a virus like no other and has left a ragged scar on humanity whose depth we do not yet fully appreciate.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) learn the intriguing history of HIV/AIDS from Africa to the United States and back again, 2) study the current understanding of HIV infection and the manifestation of full-blown AIDS, 3) explore the social consequences of a disease that currently infects one in four people in South Africa and one in 300 children and adults in the United States and that resists eradication due to the stigma associated with infection and the propensity of the virus to mutate. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) participate actively in discussion and case studies on HIV and AIDS, treatment options, social consequences, policy planning, and self-protection, among other topics; 2) write five reflections on self-selected stories from 28: Stories of AIDS in Africa;  3) complete an individual project of their choosing with instructor permission such as writing a paper, producing a work of art or music, volunteering their time to an HIV/AIDS service organization, organizing a fund-raiser for an HIV/AIDS service organization, shadowing HIV/AIDS researchers, etc.;  4) make an oral presentation describing their project to the class.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: 28: Stories of AIDS in Africa by Stephanie Nolen, Walker & Company

GRADING SYSTEM: Student Option

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 362

MARTIAL ARTS AND SELF DEFENSE: HISTORY AND PRACTICE

M. MEYSENBURG

This course introduces the history and practice of various martial arts and self-defense techniques. There will be academic and physical components to the course.  Academically, students will survey different martial arts traditions.  Through a variety of media, students will be introduced to some of the many martial arts traditions that have been developed around the world. Students will work in teams to study and report on the history of one martial arts tradition.  Physically, students will learn fundamental martial arts and self-defense techniques.  Specifically, students will learn the first level material for Songahm Taekwondo, one of the most popular martial arts styles in the United States.  Self-defense techniques will include situational awareness, basic striking and kicking, releases, and rudimentary knife and gun defenses.  Strenuous physical activity and close contact with other students in the class will be required during the physical component of this class.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: In this course, students will 1) gain broad knowledge of many different martial arts styles, through video presentations and Internet research; 2) gain more in-depth knowledge of a particular martial arts style, through the preparation and presentation of a written report; 3) learn the basic stances, blocks, kicks, hand techniques, one-step sparring combinations, and form for the beginning level of Songahm Taekwondo; 4) learn basic, practical self-defense techniques.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all class sessions; 2) participate in class discussions based on video presentations of different martial arts styles; 3) in teams, research, prepare, and present a significant paper on a chosen martial arts style; 4) participate in the in-class martial arts and self-defense training sessions; 5) participate in a rank testing on the last day of class, where students will demonstrate, and be evaluated on, their mastery of the basic Songahm Taekwondo and self-defense techniques.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Students will be required to perform research on the Internet, and/or through library readings.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Each student should have access to a pair of open-fingered, mixed-martial-arts gloves, like the kind used in the Doane PED 101 Kickboxing class. In addition, each student should have a moldable mouth guard for the self-defense drills, and male students should have athletic supporters/cups.

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


 

ITM 368

QUALITY IMPROVEMENT WORKSHOP: LEARNING TO USE THE BASIC TOOLS OF QUALITY

T. WIEDMAN

Though difficult to define, quality is important to us all; and mastering basic quality improvement techniques can provide benefits to people throughout their entire careers.  Fortunately, the basic tools used to improve quality are not difficult to learn.  Using a variety of videos, hands-on exercises, reading material, handouts, mini-projects, and class discussion, students will explore the concepts, methods, and tools that form the foundation for quality improvement programs worldwide.  These techniques can be used to help any type of organization improve almost any type of process.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: In this hands-on course, students will 1) explore the history and philosophy of quality improvement, 2) understand the sources and types of variation, 3) learn eight basic quality tools and find practical applications for their use, 4) learn to construct and interpret a basic control chart, 5) use multiple quality tools to understand different aspects of a single process and suggest strategies to improve that process.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all sessions and actively participate in hands-on class activities and discussions; 2) read all assigned material and complete short quizzes based upon the readings; 3) complete several hands-on mini-projects to gain experience in the use of the quality tools; 4) analyze simple data using a control chart and discuss the results of the analysis in a short, final paper.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Clark, Timothy J. (1999). Success Through Quality. Milwaukee: ASQ Quality Press.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


 

ITM 370

SHOW ME THE MONEY: THE BUSINESS OF SPORTS MARKETING

K. ZUMPFE

Many economists estimate that sports marketing is the tenth largest industry in the United States.  This course will enable students to apply critical thinking skills to considering the impact sports play on our lives. From Pee Wees to the Big League, many of us are either playing or spectating.  Nearly all of us are purchasing. Whether it's a ticket to an event, a licensed t-shirt for a birthday present, or an entry fee, part of our income and time is spent on the sports industry.

During Interterm students will discuss such issues as: how to get more people to attend a sports event, how to sell more sports-related products, and how to use a sports platform as the foundation for marketing non-sports products.  In addition, students will explore concepts of sponsorships; ethics and the athlete; ethics and the participants; distribution, pricing, product, and promotional decisions in sports marketing as well as emerging issues in sports marketing.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students successfully completing this course should be able to evaluate the elements necessary to create an effective sports marketing strategy.  In addition, they should have a better understanding of how to apply strategies and tactics within the sports marketing environment.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: 1) Students, working in pairs, will be responsible for leading a class discussion on a chapter of the required text. Students will present a summary of the chapter, using PowerPoint. In addition, students will be required to bring examples (developed from reading beyond the text) to illustrate the author's key points.  2) Students, working in pairs, will be responsible for leading a class discussion on current sports marketing issues of their choice. The selected issues can be from a newspaper, magazine, or other relevant source that students are familiar with (a copy of the article under consideration must be given to each class member at least two days prior to the scheduled presentation date). These discussions will focus on critically analyzing the information presented. In addition, a written analysis of the issue selected will be due at the time of the presentation.  3) Students will be required to attend all classes and fieldtrips. Any unexcused absence will result in a seven percentage point decrease in the final grade.  4) Students will work in teams to develop a promotional plan for a Doane sporting event and will present their plan on the final day of class. Students will be graded on the written plan as well as the presentation.  5) Students will be required to take five pop quizzes over the assigned reading. If students are absent, they will receive a zero for that quiz.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The Elusive Fan: Reinventing Sports in a Crowded Marketplace by Irving Rein, Philip Kotler, and Ben Shields. McGraw-Hill

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.


ITM 384

A NAMASTE EXPERIENCE: TRAVEL SEMINAR AND SERVICE-LEARNING INTERTERM

K. COOPER & L. KALBACH

MAY 2011

This 14-day course is designed to blend numerous elements including off campus travel, service-learning, and interdisciplinary study.  Students will travel to several cities and villages in south India and will spend time experiencing the rich diversity of this region while exploring its many spiritual, cultural, and historical elements.  Students will spend time prior to the 14-day travel experience in several on-campus sessions preparing them for the richness and challenges of this travel course.  Key features of the course will include exposure to the great contradiction and contrast of India.  They will witness, side by side, the most contemporary expressions of technology and globalization along with the marginalization of the Dalits, (the Untouchables). Students will view the splendors of ancient architectural temples alongside dwellings handmade of mud.  As they work with the Indian people in their service-learning project, students will feel and appreciate the great welcoming heart of South India.  Students will leave India having worked in partnership with the villagers of Chengalpattu to build an open air school and return to the United States as members of a global learning community.

This course fulfills the multicultural education interterm requirement.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) be exposed to the religions and cultures of South India, 2) gain an understanding of the nature of hospitality and what it means to be honored for one's humanness, 3) engage in service-learning projects as a lens to understanding what it means to be in reciprocal human relationships, 4) explore firsthand the many layers and challenges of sustainable living and the threats to this world view posed by globalization, 4) will understand the struggles in Indian history while honoring the legacy of accomplishments of its people.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) research the meditation traditions of the various religions that will be encountered in South India, 2) fully participate in daily activities, 3) prepare two, 15-minute morning devotions for possible use during the travel seminar, 4) complete assigned readings, 5) keep a daily journal, 6) write a 3-4 page paper, 7) student participation in these activities will be evaluated by faculty.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTMirrorwork:  50 Years of Indian Writing (with special emphasis on selected works by Narayan, Perera and Roy, Markandaya, Anand, Mistry, Ghosh and Seth, Nehru,  Ambedkar, and Chaudhari).  The Mahabharata, abridged by Chakravarthi Narasimhan, Columbia University Press, NY, 1997.  Selections from The Essential Writings of B. R. Ambedkar. (2002) Oxford University Press.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $2,500

DEADLINES:  $200 deposit due in June or July 2010.  Monthly payments of $300 will start in August 2010.

Note:  Travel scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 385

CAREER EXPLORATION AND PLANNING

C. ERSLAND

This course will provide students with an introduction to career development theories and applications and offer opportunities for career exploration, planning, and job search skill development which will serve them throughout their work lives and expand their knowledge about career opportunities.  It will focus on increasing student understanding of career development theories and applications; enhancing student self-awareness and self-exploration; assessment of career and academic interests; and gaining an understanding of the world of work compatible with students' personality styles, skills, interests, abilities, and values. The course will consist of lectures, discussions, guest speakers, and group work.  Individual and group assignments/projects will be involved.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Student will 1) become aware of resources available to the career planning and job search process; 2) identify one's own personality type, skills, interests, goals, and values; 3) relate personal characteristics to potential occupational fields; 4) use a decision-making model to identify personal alternatives, consequences, and desirable outcomes; 5) develop a persuasive resume which reflects the above self-knowledge and decision-making; 6) learn to deal effectively with interview situations; 7) understand economic, political, cultural, and demographic influences on job availability; 8) be aware of current theories of career development and what they indicate about one's developmental status; 9) plan next steps in career decision-making or implementation; 10) become aware of what employers look for in potential employees and what it takes to be successful on the job.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend all class sessions and engage in class discussion, activities, and interactions; 2) complete assessment instruments and informational interview; 3) complete all assignments, scheduled presentations, and a final project.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTSCareer Exploration & Planning Student Manual

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


  ITM 386

DISCOVER PERU

L. FORESTER & J. JOHNSON

MAY 2011

Discovering Peru and the Amazon region of Peru is a 14-day tour.  Beginning the tour, students will fly to Lima for a day excursion of the city.  The next day students will fly to Puerto Maldonado.  Puerto Maldonado is the beginning point of a three-day Amazon excursion.  Students will take a boat up the river to the Amazon Lodge where they will be staying.   Activities at the resort include taking a catwalk tour of the jungle, visiting native villages/houses, and canoeing the Amazon.  A jungle hike and piranha fishing are included.  A "survival night" in the jungle is also part of the tour.  All Amazon excursions will be accompanied by a trained Amazon guide.

From the Amazon, travels continue in Peru.  Students will visit Cuzco and the Huaca Pucllana archaeological center to learn about the culture that flourished here in the 5th and 8th centuries.  Students will also visit the Santo Domingo Convent Monastery, the Plaza de Armas, and the Cathedral among other sites.  The trip will continue to the Sacred Valley where students will walk among the ancient Inca Ruins.  A whitewater rafting trip in the Sacred Valley is also planned.  A highlight of the trip will be the train trip to Machu Picchu and the tour of the great Inca city.   Machu Picchu, a world heritage site, is known as the Lost City of the Incas.  It is found 8,000 feet above sea level.  It was built around AD1430.  It has become one of the most sought after tourist destinations in the Americas. Finally, students will visit the Lake Titicaca area and take a full day tour of the lake and the artificial islands which inhabit it, visiting the native people that make their homes there.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain a better understanding of the diversity found in the population of Peru, 2) learn about the history of Peru and its effects on present day Peru, 3) learn about the ecological benefits of the Amazon region, 4) learn about the Amazon region including the flora and fauna, 5) learn jungle survival techniques, 6) learn about the Inca Empire of Peru.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) conduct one seminar on an aspect of Peru (prior to leaving, students will be assigned topics), 2) attend daily seminars, 3) complete all assignments, 4) abide by the conduct code for the trip, 5) keep a personal journal, 6) student participation will be evaluated by faculty.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXT:  Students will be assigned a topic to research about sights to be visited prior to the trip.  Presentation of the research will take place on the trip.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $4,299 (covers all transportation, lodging, meals in the Amazon, and all breakfasts.  Students will be responsible for lunch and dinner all days except when we are in the Amazon.  Additional tours and souvenirs are the students' responsibility.  In addition, there will be a minimal fee assessed for tips for the tour guides.  This will be approximately $30 total.

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2010.

Note:  Travel scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 387

ARTS ARE BASIC, METHODS IN AESTHETIC EDUCATION

R. GILL

In this course, students will explore how specific works of art become tools for learning across the curriculum. Course experiences will include extensive exploration of multiple intelligences, specific areas of curriculum preparation and the development, by each individual participant, of a guidebook/portfolio that will include curriculum writing and experiential learning through the arts.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will gain development of creativity, increased problem-solving skills, and intuitive assessments through experiential learning.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  The primary product that students will develop through this course will be a cumulative portfolio that will include: lesson plans,  journaling, arts discipline research, research and assessment of other programs using the arts as a teaching tool.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Text will include various writings by Howard Gardner, Maxine Greene, and Eric Booth.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 388

THE MATHEMATICAL TOURIST

P. HART

An exploration of accessible math topics not taught in traditional high school math courses.  Topics will include:  numerology, connections between art and math, probability and gambling, game theory, voting systems, and cryptography.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will gain development of creativity, increased problem-solving skills, and intuitive assessments through experiential learning.  Upon the completion of this course, students should             1) appreciate a variety of math topics related to other disciplines, 2) understand how mathematical reasoning is used to solve problems in non-mathematical areas.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students in this course will be required to 1) participate actively in class discussions and activities, 2) successfully complete daily quizzes and assignments, 3) prepare weekly projects/presentations to share with class.

PREREQUISITE:  Completion of Doane Plan Quantitative Reasoning requirement

TEXTS:  Readings and handouts provided by instructor

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  2:00 p.m.


ITM 389

EUROPEAN ROAD TRIP: AMSTERDAM TO PARIS

V. KNOBEL

JANUARY 2011

This off-campus interterm will travel from Omaha to Amsterdam, then tour throughout the Netherlands and into France, finishing in Paris. Students will have numerous hands-on experiences in places with historical, religious, artistic, and architectural significance.  The tour begins in Amsterdam, known as "the Venice of the North" with its numerous canals and bridges.  Students will experience art in museums and churches and tour the Royal Palace before moving on to the rest of the Netherlands.  Students will then explore the Dutch cities of Den Haag (where Anne Frank's house is located), Delft (known for its canals and pottery), and Brugge (the world's capital of chocolate).  Each of these stops will include visits to various museums examining world-famous collections of art.  The tour will then move across the border into France, concluding in Paris.  Students will visit the world famous attractions of the Eiffel Tower, Louvre, Notre Dame Cathedral, Arc de Triomphe, and the Pantheon.  In addition to touring these attractions, students will be able to take a stroll down the Champs Elysees (world famous for its shopping) and have the opportunity to visit the Palace at Versailles (home of Marie Antoinette).

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) experience the culture and traditions of the Netherlands and France, 2) learn history hands-on by visiting cathedrals and museums, 3) examine art found from world-famous collections in museums.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend all pre-trip orientation meetings; 2) prior to leaving, research designated topic (or site), providing background information for a specific stop on the tour; 3) use findings to create a document that will be put in a course notebook, 4) attend all scheduled activities as per the official itinerary, including morning breakfast where students will preview the day's events by presenting research findings of assigned cities (or sites), 5) keep a journal daily in course notebook.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXT:  Course notebook (to be compiled by students' research findings)

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $3,329 (covers all airfare and motorcoach travel, lodging, breakfast daily, entrance fees to museums and attractions, and dinner on six nights)

DEADLINES:  $500 deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2010

Note:  Travel scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 391

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF HATE, HATE GROUPS, AND HATE CRIMES

H. LAMBERT

Hate groups are often portrayed by the media as fanatical cults on the fringe of society. Although these groups do exist, a majority of hate groups recruit from the mainstream. Hate group membership continues to rise in the United States, and research suggests that the majority of hate crime offenders are not even members of organized groups. This course will examine hate groups, hate crimes and the psychosocial underpinnings of hate. Various hate groups will be examined in terms of recruitment, leadership, and ideology. Furthermore, hate crimes will be analyzed in order to understand their impact on individuals and society.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  As a result of this course, students should be able to:  1) identify various hate groups, 2) identify psychosocial elements of hate groups, 3) define hate crimes, 4) discuss why hate crimes occur, and 5) discuss the impact of hate crimes.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) complete all reading and classroom assignments, 2) research and develop a project on a specific hate group or hate crime issue, and 3) complete a final exam.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Handouts provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 392

GO SLOW, GO LOCAL

L. MANNS

In this course students will examine two movements which have gained momentum over the past few years; specifically, the Slow Food and Go Local movements.  The Slow Food movement's philosophy states that our food should: 1) taste good, 2) be produced in a clean way, and 3) fairly compensate producers for their work.  The Go Local movement places emphasis on supporting local producers of fruits, vegetables, meat, eggs, and dairy that do not rely on herbicides, pesticides, and synthetic fertilizers.  Both of these movements are gradually reshaping the business of growing and supplying food, especially in countries such as the United States.  Students will gain an appreciation for how economic analysis can enhance one's understanding of some of the issues raised by industrial agriculture and the challenge presented to it by the Slow Food and Go Local movements.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will acquire an understanding of many of the issues surrounding the way our food is currently produced and what changes could result in the food business if the Slow Food and Go Local movements continue to grow.  Specifically, students will: 1) examine various economic, health, and environmental issues associated with our current food production system; 2) apply relevant economic analysis to the issues under consideration; and 3) evaluate how the Go Slow and Go Local movements could change the system.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to: 1) attend class, 2) lead and participate in class discussions, 3) write one critical analysis paper (5-7 pages), and take a comprehensive final exam.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTSSlow Food Nation by Carlo Petrini, Rizzoli Ex Libris, 2007;  Food Rules by Michael Pollan, Penguin, 2009;  The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan, Penguin, 2007.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: $20 for meal supplies

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 393

BECOMING A LEVEL 5 LEADER

D. MERRITT

Collins (2001) defines five levels of leadership ranging from Level 1 - an individual who makes productive contributions through talent, knowledge, skills, and good work habits to Level 5 - an individual who builds enduring greatness through a paradoxical blend of personal humility and professional will. The focus of this course is the application of the Level 5 Leadership principles set out by Collins (2001). Specific attention will be given to six overriding concepts: good is the enemy of great, confronting the brutal facts, the Hedgehog concept, a culture of discipline, the Flywheel concept, and the Doom Loop. Additional topical coverage will include the Level 5 pyramid and the impact of technology on leadership.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students successfully completing this course will 1) understand the principles underlying the concept of leadership, 2) be able to apply those principles to their daily lives, 3) enhance their critical reasoning skills, and 4) enhance their communication skills, and 5) enhance their teamwork skills.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend all class sessions and actively participate in all discussions, 2) lead two class discussions (completed in teams) on the information presented by Collins (2001), 3) successfully complete a minimum of eight Learning Journals that critically reflect on the principles underpinning Level 5 Leadership and how the student will apply those principles in his/her own situation, 4) complete a self-evaluation that builds a case for receiving a grade of "P" for the course.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Collins, J. C. (2001). Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... and Others Don't. New York: HarperCollins.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 394

A LOW TECH GUIDE TO A SOUND MIND AND BODY

M. ORSAG

Inspired by the ancient Greek and Roman ideal of a sound mind in a sound body and powered by a spirit of friendly competition and a low-tech approach, this course will divide the 12-person class into three four-person teams that will move through a series of challenging brain-teasers and physical workouts that will incorporate sound physical training principles and help to build a wide range of analytical reasoning skills.  Certain challenges will blend both physical and mental problem solving.  The class will take two field trips to Omaha. Mental challenges will include: analytical matching, story puzzles, crosswords, sudoku, chess, logic games, and a debate-style challenge called "the Verbal Gladiator." Physical challenges may include: Bikram (hot) Yoga, Indoor Rock Climbing, Extreme Core Strength and Bodyweight Exercises, Weighted Exercises and Antagonist Muscle Training, Kettlebell and Cardio Training Routines, a Martial Arts introduction, and a final day of Restorative Techniques and Meditation. There will be a multicultural aspect to the course as well.  The routines employed (the cultural contexts will be explained) are drawn from a wide range of world cultures including: India, Japan, England, Russia, Israel, and the United States.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will master not only the various techniques involved, but will be offered the opportunity (on a daily basis) to make difficult comparative choices and pursue success-maximizing strategies in terms of mental acuity and physical/fitness and health.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Successful completion of the tasks - students will be quite challenged to both mind and body - and the completion of beginning and ending comment/question forms that will both reinforce content and have students draw broader lessons from their experiences.  Daily "after action" reviews of activities will guide students in objectively analyzing strengths and weaknesses and developing strategies to maximize performance.

PREREQUISITE:  Basic level of physical fitness/health and permission of instructor

TEXTS:  None

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $75 to cover the cost of field trips

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.


ITM 395

THE DOANE CHOIRS TOUR SOUTH AMERICA

K. RUNESTAD

MAY 2011

The Doane choral program tours internationally every three years, heightening global perspectives and helping to set music within the contexts for which it was written.  Specific attention will be given to studying and performing music of the areas we're touring,  including both South American folk and classical traditions.  In addition, attention will be given to geographical, historical, and artistic traditions of these areas, including advance readings and discussions, and tour activities that will enhance this exploration.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will

  • Grow musically-the concerts generally get better and better as we unwrap the ever deeper levels of musical meaning that serious music reveals
  • Perform masterworks of the rich musical choral tradition at a high level
  • Introduce audiences to the rich body of modern repertoire to which they might not otherwise be exposed
  • Grow together as a unique performing and musical community
  • Serve Doane College/Nebraska/US by being positive representatives
  • Explore a wide variety of multidisciplinary perspectives on South American culture, especially music but also including history, religion, and the visual arts.
  • If applicable in a students' belief system, explore the spiritual meaning of choral music written to sacred texts
  • Learn about the history and music of South America
  • Sing in unique musical, acoustical, and historical environments-especially churches and cathedrals
  • Sing for the sophisticated musical audiences

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to complete musical preparation and readings from the curriculum chosen by Dr. Runestad, rehearse and memorize all musical selections to be performed on the tour and understand their cultural contexts, and perform 7-10 ninety-minute concerts.  Students are also required to follow all rules of tour and participate in the group cultural opportunities afforded by the trip.  All music must be memorized by the time of the tour.  For some students this last requirement could require some out-of-class work.

PREREQUISITE:  Membership in either Collegiate Chorale or Doane Choir in the 2010-2011 spring semester, or permission of instructor.  Mandatory rehearsals for the tour will be from 4:00-5:30 on Wednesday afternoons.

TEXT:  Curriculum will be the music assigned to be performed in the course, as well as additional readings as necessary and required.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $3,500 plus cost of visas and passport

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2010.

Note:  Travel scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 396

LOOKING AT APPALACHIA

H. STARK

Students will gain knowledge of the often misunderstood and historically rich region of the United States known as Appalachia.  This course will provide the opportunity for students to view and discuss visual art, music, and film based on and created in this region.  Issues of identity, place, and stereotype will be addressed in terms of artworks viewed.  This course will help to shed light on an area of our country unfamiliar to many students.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  By the end of this course, students will have a basic understanding of the history of this region of the United States as well as an appreciation for its art.  Students will learn basic vocabulary for discussing art and music and should be able to articulate their ideas in written and oral form.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to participate in class discussions, complete any assigned readings, and write responses/analyses of artworks and films viewed.   Students are required to attend all classes.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Handouts provided by the instructor and links through Blackboard.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  2:00 p.m.


ITM 397

ROLLING THROUGH GERMANY, AUSTRIA, AND THE CZECH REPUBLIC

D. SWARTZLANDER

MAY 2011

This 14-day course involves touring three European countries by bicycle, much of it along the Danube River.  The bicycling level is easy - 2-4 hours per day, 15-35 miles per day.  Bicycles are provided.   Also provided are bilingual tour leaders.  Among other sights, students will visit two  historical centers that have been UNESCO World Heritage sites; learn about Czech, German, and Austrian life; and sleep in a 16th-century former Jesuit monastery.  Students also will visit Plav, a typical Bohemian village on the banks of a small river, eat with local families and enjoy Zlata Koruna, one of the best-preserved Gothic monasteries in Bohemia.  In addition, students will bike the largest national park in the Czech Republic, rolling through beautiful forests.  In Melk, students can take a guided tour of the spectacular Benedictine Abbey, one of Europe's largest Baroque monasteries, and eat lunch in the abbey gardens.  In Vienna, students can tour famous museums, such as the Secession Building and the Kunsthistorisches.  Students also can visit the riding school famous for Lipizzaner horses or check out the Hofburg Imperial Palace, which dates to 1279.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will learn 1) about the area's politics, socioeconomic levels, and history; 2) the joys of long-distance bicycling; 3) how to write travel stories; 4) how to interview and conduct research for their stories; 5) how to write and edit news stories; 6) how to gather and edit audio and video files; 7) how to shoot photographs that tell a story; 8) how to compile audio slideshows; 8) how to produce audio and video packages for the Web; 9) how to speak in front of a microphone and in front of a video camera; 10) the importance of meeting deadlines.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) participate in daily course activities, 2) complete their journalistic assignments, 3) students will be evaluated based upon their participation in daily course activities.

PREREQUISITE:  Students must know how to ride a bicycle and be physically able to do so.

TEXT:  None.  All research will be done on site.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $3,100 (includes airfare, hotel, use of bicycle and helmet, bilingual leaders, van support, daily maps and directions, and 15 meals.  Students would need to pay for meals beyond the 15 included and for whatever souvenirs they want.

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2010.

Note:  Travel scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


  ITM 398

NUCLEAR ARMS: PAST, PRESENT, AND POSSIBLE FUTURES

N. VACCARO

In the over six decades since the end of the Second World War, nuclear weapons have never again been employed in a conflict. Nonetheless, the existence of nuclear weapons technology, and fears of nuclear catastrophe, have had a profound impact on world politics and remain a major global concern.

This class examines the topic of nuclear weapons from a variety of historical and contemporary perspectives. Students will begin with a discussion of the origins and basic technology of nuclear armaments. The class will then examine the Cold War period, exploring events and issues related to the nuclear rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union; these issues include arms races, deterrence strategies, and possible scenarios for superpower nuclear war. Students will then examine the present day, discussing issues and debates related to nuclear proliferation and nonproliferation efforts, as well as the possible threat of nuclear terrorism.

While the course primarily considers real-world events and debates (past and present), the class will also incorporate fictional films and literary material on the subject, and will explore the impact of the nuclear era on popular culture and the popular imagination.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) develop an understanding of the nature and extent of the possible threats posed by nuclear arms, both historically and in the present day; 2) become familiar with, and participate in, major ongoing debates about the best approaches to preventing future use of nuclear weapons; 3) examine the ways in which the presence of nuclear weapons has had an impact on global politics and on the popular imagination.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend and participate in class, 2) complete several short essays, 3) complete either a final paper or a final exam (student's choice).

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  Joseph Cirincione, Bomb Scare; other selections to be assigned and provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM:  Student Option

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  2:00 p.m.


ITM 399

ARE YOU GAME?

H. YORK

What makes a game fun and interesting or even addictive and classic?  In this course, students will study existing board, card, and dice games from various genres (including puzzle, trivia, cooperative, party, resource-allocation, and abstract-strategy) and bring elements from these examples together with their own creative ideas to design a game that will be played and reviewed by others in the class.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students successfully completing this course will be able to discuss the history, basic game-play elements, and pros and cons of several types of classic games, as well as having worked with a small group of colleagues to design and present a unique, playable game.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1)  present a written and/or oral analysis of existing board games, 2) work in a small group to design a unique game, 3) present the game creation to the class for play and review, 4)  review other students' games, 5) present a written and/or oral follow-up to the creation process.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  A Blackboard site for the course will be maintained and most required reading will be posted there.  Print materials will be provided as course packets or will be on reserve in the library.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  2:00 p.m.


ITM 400

THE SCI IN SCI FI

R. LAUNGANI

Science fiction movies can be a mix of both accurate and inaccurate science. Through feature films and documentaries, students will compare the uses of science in film and discuss how "realistic" the portrayal of science actually is. Documentaries will introduce students to the current state of the various scientific disciplines. While the majority of films will focus on the biological sciences, other scientific disciplines (i.e. physics, astronomy, etc) will be included as well.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will learn how Sci-Fi movies can be a mix of both accurate and inaccurate science. The course will also, through the use of documentaries, show students where much of the science that they see in the movies is currently.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all classes, 2) participate in class discussions.

PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Scientific American October 2010: "Human evolution is not over" (provided by the professor)
GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None
CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.


ITM 401

TREASURES OF THE EARTH

P. SUTTON

Semi-precious stones such as citrine, garnet, lapis lazuli, agate, and rose quartz just to name a few, have been valued by humans throughout recorded history. Ancient civilizations incorporated treasured items made from semi-precious stones into all aspects of their lives. Many past and present cultures believe semi-precious stones are empowered with amazing properties such as healing and luck and are used to communicate with their gods. In this course, students will gain knowledge of the Earth's geologic processes responsible for the formation of semi-precious stones, the symbolism and importance given to semi-precious stones by various cultures throughout history. Student will design and make their own jewelry creations from semi-precious stone beads inspired by cultures and/or eras of their choice.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an understanding of the various geologic processes that created semi-precious stones, where the deposits are found, and how the stones are mined and worked; 2) investigate and incorporate knowledge about the roles semi-precious stones played in several world cultures throughout history and the myths and symbolism associated with semi-precious stones; 3) acquire and practice skills in designing and working with semi-precious stone beads, sterling silver, and vermeil findings to make original jewelry.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all classes; 2) complete all reading and writing assignments; 3) participate in discussions; 4) research, design and complete several pieces of beaded jewelry in class; 5) write a final paper explaining what inspired their original jewelry projects, incorporating their understanding and interpretation of the relationships between semi-precious stone items and the cultures and/or eras in which they occurred; 6) display their jewelry collection at an open show on campus and be present to talk about their work to the guests.
PREREQUISITE: None
TEXTS: Provided by the instructor
GRADING SYSTEM: Student Option
ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Cost of supplies - approximately $50 and $150 depending on materials chosen
CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

 


CED 205 for 0 credits is available to students who are enrolled in an on-campus 3-hour Interterm course.

CED 205-1 and CED 205-2

INTRODUCTION TO FIELD EXPERIENCE (0)

C. ERSLAND

An introduction to the field experience. Concerned with 1) helping the student prepare for, initiate, and select the field placement; 2) preparing the learning contract; and 3) understanding/dealing with issues associated with the field experience.

Through the field experience (internship) students apply knowledge acquired from formal coursework and integrate experiential learning.  This process should result in a better understanding between the two and move the student from being an observer of fieldwork to participant.  Course content will focus on career exploration, job search skills (résumé and cover letter preparation, interviewing techniques, researching industries/companies, agencies), and internship guidelines and procedures.  The student will prepare for a field placement for a future semester (frequently internships are filled 3-5 months in advance). Advanced planning by the student is imperative - DO NOT wait until the semester starts to begin investigating possible internship sites!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) learn how to create and develop a résumé and cover letter to prepare for applying for internships; 2) learn about different types of interviews, interviewing strategies, preparing for the interview, and what to do after the interview; 3) conduct an interview with someone within a job or position of interest and write a paper.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend all four class sessions; 2) satisfactorily complete all assignments.

PREREQUISTE:  None

TEXTS: CED 205 Booklet

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  Two sections - 1:00 to 1:50 p.m. and 2:00 to 2:50 p.m. on Monday and Wednesday, January 3 through January 12.


DEPARTMENTAL PREFIX 290, 390, 490

DIRECTED STUDY

An opportunity for supervised independent re­search in a specialized area based on the inter­est of the student.  Credits are to be applied toward degree pro­gram.  (Stu­dents must enroll in two ITM desig­nated courses during their four years at Doane.  A third interterm requirement may be met by enrolling in a departmentally-designat­ed course.)

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will learn to do indepen­dent research.

PREREQUISITE:  Permission of Instructor

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades


ITM/DEPARTMENTAL PREFIX 421

INTERNSHIP

Contact the Career Development office for more information.