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2010

ITM 118

MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION

M. JOHNSON-FARR & D. WEHRS

In this course, students are presented with information and opportunities to accept and affirm student populations with diversity according to race, ethnicity, religion, gender, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, or special needs.  There are in-class presentations and discussions and field trips to area schools and service agencies. Students will observe and participate in activities with K-12 students. The course will include activities on Sundays with alternatives for students unable to participate with the class. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will enhance their knowledge and understanding of multicultural issues in order to develop a conceptual framework for classroom practice.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will required to 1) attend and be actively involved in all class sessions; 2) complete selected readings out of class for in class sharing; 3) participate in one group presentation on a diversity issue; 4) read and critique one literature piece; 5) complete an alternative activity approved in advance by the instructor if there is a scheduling conflict with class events.

PREREQUISITE: Education major

TEXTS: Assigned readings

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: $100 for admission to sites and other activities

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m. (half and whole days)

ROOM: EA 236/238  


ITM 134

BASKETBALL OFFICIATING

T. HOOD   

This course will offer technical instruction and practical experience with officiating organized basketball.  Discussion-lecture will be offered to familiarize the student with the national federation rules, with appropriate officiating mechanics, and with acceptable positioning for officiating.  Students will also officiate organized scrimmages with critical comments to be offered by the instructor. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an understanding of the basketball rules; 2) be able to apply knowledge of the rules to various real and hypothetical situations; 3) gain an understanding of basketball officiating technique; 4) demonstrate proper officiating technique in controlled scrimmage settings.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class; 2) participate in daily discussion; 3) score a minimum amount of points from 15 quizzes and one major exam; 4) participate in basketball scrimmages; 5) officiate controlled basketball scrimmages; 6) score a minimum amount of points from a practical exam of officiating a basketball scrimmage.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The N.S.A.A. Basketball Officiating Packet. Information for obtaining the packet will be available in the link, Registration Requirements/Application Form,@ on the Web site, www.nsaahome.org

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Officiating jersey, whistle, lanyard, and clean basketball shoes.

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  FH 23 & Arena 


ITM 158

MYTH, MUSE AND MATHESIS

J. JOHNSON

This course is intended to be a fun and recreational look at the history of mathematics, mathematicians and their contributions, and will be of special interest to mathematics education majors.  The course will investigate such topics as geometry, bases, algorithms no longer in use for basic operations, tessellations, mental gymnastics, magic squares, problem solving, pi, platonic solids, Pascal triangle, Pythagorean triples, geometric puzzles, fractals, fibonacci numbers, and the golden ratio where it appears in nature.  Students will look at some incidents of famous mathematicians to show their 'humanness' and anecdotes of them to show their eccentricities and frailties. 

This course will give a basic overview of the development of some of mathematics.  It will demonstrate its broad diversity and its exponential growth over the past 3,000 years.  It is intended to look at mathematics not only as the queen of the sciences but also as an art in its own right from a semi-historical perspective. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  This course is designed to show how the history of mathematics 1) can be entertaining, enriching, recreational, rewarding, interesting, and intriguing; 2) can relate to the physical world; 3) can increase the understanding and appreciation of mathematics and other disciplines; 4) can demonstrate why mathematics was created and how; 5) is continually growing, developing and changing.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to write a major paper.  Problem solving will be emphasized by requiring a large set of problems due beyond those assigned daily.  Daily homework will be assigned and graded.  Students will be required to participate in class activities.  Students will also be required to do some library research on various historical topics and perspectives with at least one of those topics to be given as an in class presentation.  A small three-dimensional paper project will also be assigned.  A graphing calculator is strongly recommended.

PREREQUISITE:  An interest in mathematics

TEXTS:  None. Handouts provided by the instructor.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  LI 223 


ITM 202

HEIMAT (HOMELAND) - A FAMILY CHRONICLE

P. REINKORDT

A study of the interplay of family and national events in Germany from 1919 to 1982, as well as a student-generated study of the interplay of United States history with their own family's experience during that same period.  Students will explore issues such as the intrusion of world history on personal life, family dynamics - between husband and wife and children and parents/grandparents, social class, regional prejudices, and conflicts between rich and poor.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: The 15-hour film is the example from Germany, and comparing this with their own family chronicle, students may be able to understand that common world events can be viewed from a different cultural perspective.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend and participate actively in all classes; 2) do research on a time line of world events from 1919-1982, comparing these events to their own family history and the impact they had there; 3) write a research paper and enter research findings on an electronic Web conference board; 4) keep a journal; 5) take two examinations.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: Students need to do some or most of their family research before class instruction begins (ideally during Christmas break). Instructor will have a questionnaire available before Thanksgiving break. Local newspaper archives or the State Historical Society in Lincoln are sources for information.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Selections from history texts and library research, family records (if available), one fiction work from the time of 1919-1982 in Germany.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  GA 326 


ITM 227

INTERPRETING THE UNKNOWN: MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCES IN THE 20TH CENTURY

M. ORSAG

"Interpreting the Unknown" will indeed be a key part of this course. How people depict or explain a mysterious event or social phenomenon often presents a revealing insight into their patterns of thought and understanding. Students will be challenged not only to understand mysteries but also to pinpoint hidden questions or meanings that lurk both within the "unknowable" and within human responses to it. The course is organized into six units that are evenly split between factual and fictional disappearances. Unit titles are:  Women, Political Ideology, The Environment, The X-Files, Serial Killers, Future Doomsdays.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will use the phenomenon of disappearance to gain a better understanding of important 20th century trends.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class; 2) participate in class discussions; 3) take an analytical quiz; 4) complete a final project (7-10 page research paper or a group project/presentation).

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: None

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM:  CM 03


ITM 230

FROM OPINION TO ARGUMENT

D. MERRITT

This course will enable students to apply critical thinking skills to listening, reading, and writing. Students will learn elements of reasoning, traits of the reasoning mind, universal intellectual standards for reasoning, and how to apply these in any domain where assessment is taking place. They will learn to think consciously, deliberately, and skillfully. The major focus of the course is how to think rather than what to think.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students successfully completing this course should be able to evaluate information for its relevance, identify assumptions with greater accuracy, construct plausible inferences, and apply elements of sound critical thinking.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Student teams will be responsible for leading two class discussions on current issues of their choice. A written analysis of the issue selected will be due at the time of its presentation.  Each student will be required to keep a journal that critically analyzes their own educational experience.  (Only the instructor will review these journal entries, and all journals will be returned to the students upon completion of the course.)

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Paul, Richard (1993). Critical Thinking: What every person needs to survive in a rapidly changing world. Foundation for Critical Thinking, Santa Rosa: CA.

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  GA 500 


ITM 277

ROBOlympics

A. ENGEBRETSON

In this course, students will work in teams to design, build, and program simple robots, using Lego Mindstorms robotics kits.  Students will experiment with robotic motion, behavior programming, sensors, and vision.  Students will construct pre-designed "training" robots, then use their experience to design, build, and program machines of their own creation.  The course will culminate in a ROBOlympics where teams of students pit their final robot designs against each other.  Students will document their designs, using the written word, digital photography, and digital video media, to produce Web-based documentation of their final robots.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will achieve a basic understanding of the various elements of robotics, for example, the physical components required, methods of movement, sensor techniques, and behavior programming.  Students will also gain experience in scientific documentation, through the documentation of their designs.  The documentation work will also expose students to aspects of Web page development.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class, 2) in teams, build working instances of the training robots, 3)  in teams, design, build and program original robots to participate in the ROBOlympics, 4) produce step-by-step, Web-based documentation detailing the construction and operation of their final robot designs.

PREREQUISITE: None.  No prior experience with robots or programming is necessary!

TEXTS: Handouts provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: LI 238 & 240 


ITM 293

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EVIL

B. PAUWELS

Using primarily a psychological perspective, this course will investigate the various factors that contribute to instances of human cruelty and brutality. Through readings, videos, and class discussion, students will study the human tendency to think in terms of Agood vs. evil,@ and critically examine the validity, usefulness, and consequences of such thinking. Topics such as terrorism, interracial violence, organized crime, serial killers, and war will be addressed.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an understanding of some of the basic psychological mechanisms behind the behavior of both victims and perpetrators of violence; 2) be able to effectively articulate the advantages and disadvantages of categorizing human behaviors/events as Agood" or Aevil@; 3) gain an understanding of the factors that influence individuals= beliefs about whether others are Agood@ or Aevil.@

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) actively participate in class discussion; 2) successfully complete several short assignments and/or quizzes based on assigned readings; 3) successfully complete one examination.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Baumeister, Roy (1999). Evil: Inside Human Violence and Cruelty. New York: W.H. Freeman and Co. (paperback version).  This primary text will be supplemented with additional assigned readings that will be made available to students through the college library.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  CM 40 


ITM 300

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

T. KAY

This class is designed to teach individuals how to communicate with the deaf.  Emphasis is placed on the following communications modes: gestures, finger spelling, and sign language.   

This course does not satisfy the Cultural Perspectives requirement of the Doane Plan

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will be able to 1) define modes of communication; 2) read finger spelling; 3) sign before the class; 4) demonstrate the proper formation of letters and signs.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class and participate in small groups; 2) sign sentences and short stories in class; 3) complete written assignment on American Sign Language or a biographical sketch of a deaf person; 4) take three quizzes; 5) read sign language from video tapes.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: A Basic Course in American Sign Language by Tom Humphries, Carol Padden, and Terrence J. O'Rouke

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM: EA 242 


ITM 315

MICHELANGELO TO MOZART: EXPLORING ITALY AND AUSTRIA

MAY 2010

R. DIERCKS   

This two-week interterm in Italy and Austria is designed to provide experiences that introduce students to the magnificent cities, geography, and culture of these two countries.  These two countries have made tremendous contributions to art, music, and culture around the world. Michelangelo and Mozart will be featured throughout the experience.  Students will explore cathedrals, castles, ruins, monuments, food, and historic places in central and northern Italy and most of Austria.  During the trip, students will learn about the culture, architecture, art, music and history of Italy and Austria.  Students will visit major cities and small historic towns in both countries.  They will tour museums, cathedrals, castles, and gardens.  Other experiences include guided walking tours where students will see schools, art galleries, and modern and historic shops.  Day trips to nearby historic and quaint small towns and villages will provide a broader perspective of the land and the people in Italy and Austria.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) gain a better understanding of the complex nature of the Italian and Austrian cultures both past and present; 2) be able to compare artistic, historical, and educational experiences of Italy and Austria to those in the United States.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend all scheduled orientations and activities prior to and during the trip; 2) complete all assigned readings; 3) keep a daily journal; 4) work in small groups to present information on selected topics related to their experiences in Italy and Austria; 5) obtain a passport; 6) obtain visas if necessary.

PREREQUISITE:  Permission of the instructor

TEXT:  Articles and handouts provided by the instructor as well as travel guides to Italy and Austria.  Brochures and other related material that are acquired during the trip.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $3,000 (includes airfare, lodging, guided bus and walking tours, entrance fees to places visited, breakfast and evening meal each day).  The first deposit (a minimum of 10% of the course costs (or $300.00) by September 10 or earlier. A second deposit of $1,000 is due December 1. The final payment of approximately $1,700 is due February 15, 2010.

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2009. 

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor. 


ITM 319

LEADING THE WAY TO CHANGE

C. PETR

The Doane College purpose is to educate students to serve and to lead in the state, nation, and the world.  This course will provide students with an introduction to leadership theories and models, offer students the opportunity to evaluate and understand their own leadership potential, and give students the chance to practice the skills needed to lead oneself and others.  The course will focus on "the premise that leadership is a relational process of people working together to accomplish change or to make a difference that will benefit the common good."  It will also be stressed that anyone can be part of the leadership process, whether as a formal leader or as an active, committed member.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an understanding of the traditional and contemporary theories of leadership; 2) recognize one's own leadership potential and capacity for change; 3) develop the skills necessary to be an effective leader; 4) gain an understanding of the importance of relationships in creating and implementing change.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) participate in class interaction and discussion; 2) complete a 3-5-page paper; 3) create a visual representation of one's leadership journey; 4) give a group presentation.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Komives, S., Lucas N. and McMahon, T. Exploring Leadership For College Students Who Want to Make a Difference, Jossey-Bass Publishers, San Francisco, 1998.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: $25.00 for retreat costs and materials

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: EA 307 


ITM 321

IN PURSUIT OF SUSTAINABLE LIVING

L. KALBACH

This course will explore the idea of "sustainable" living by investigating how people can change consumptive behaviors detrimental to the environment, animals, and the welfare of one's-self and other human beings.  An emphasis will be placed on analyzing societal messages that encourage humans to behave in detrimental ways, particularly media images promoting conspicuous consumption.  A particular focus will be paid to the role of such consumption in the current economic crisis and recovery.  Students will investigate the difficulties in countering such messages personally and on a societal basis.  Students will engage in two projects, one service-learning and one final project to develop a personal action plan to begin transforming their personal behavior.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) engage in media literacy activities; 2) engage in personal analysis and reflection; 3) explore subliminal messages and their impact on human behavior over time; 4) explore ideas in sustainable economics and personal living; 5) explore the mergence of social entrepreneurial developments locally, nationally, and globally; 6) use service-learning and social media to promote social action.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all class sessions and engage in positive group collaboration; 2) complete all class assignments, activities, and a final project; 3) participate and complete a service-learning project.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The Sustainability Revolution: Portrait of a Paradigm Shift (2005) Andrews R. Edwards

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: EA 242 


ITM 326

BUZZING, BLOWING, AND BOPPING: THE PHYSICAL BASIS OF MUSIC

C. WENTWORTH

Virtually all people are attracted to making and listening to music.  But how are the limitless variety of pleasing sounds produced by the voice or musical instruments?  In this course, students will use simple physical principles to describe sounds from several kinds of instruments, including the human voice.  Students will investigate questions such as

  • Why do different instruments have their unique sound?
  • How do different human voices produce singing?
  • How does the human ear actually hear sounds?

These questions will be investigated using many hands-on activities.  Students will also build a variety of musical instruments from simple materials. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will be able to 1) use basic physics principles required to describe waves and sound; 2) obtain sound data from musical instruments using appropriate sound analysis software; 3) describe the sounds that different kinds of instruments make using scientific principles; 4) describe how human voice produces sound; 5) describe how the human ear perceives sound; 6) build simple musical instruments.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) perform all laboratory and hands-on activities; 2) participate in class discussions; 3) complete Web-based readings and homework assignments; 4) take four quizzes; 5) write a paper on a musical instrument.

PREREQUISITE: Completion of the Doane Basic Mathematical Skills requirement (score 19 or higher on the ACT, pass Doane's Computational Skills Test, or complete MTH/DSS 090 with a grade of C- or higher).

TEXTS: A variety of sources available on the Web

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM: LI 233 


ITM 340

FAITH SEEKING UNDERSTANDING

K. COOPER   

The purpose of this course to is to help the student to think theologically.  The course will focus on the nature and interconnections among various traditions that are central to faith and praxis.  It will engage various theological perspectives across multiple traditions and across the world.  It will use this method of comparison as a means to help the student develop critical understanding of how their own theological beliefs hang together in a framework and how that framework can be in dialogue with other frameworks.  Students will gain an understanding of the connections between the three major monotheistic traditions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) as well as Buddhism and Hinduism.  They will explore in particular  Liberation Theology (Latin America), Black Liberation Theology, Asian Feminist Theology, Womanist Theology, Theology from Below (Third World) 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) build a theological vocabulary for articulating beliefs; 2) become acquainted with different approaches to various doctrines and develop his/her skills at evaluating implications of their theological assumptions; 3) develop personal constructive theological view points through dialogue with readings, lectures, and class discussions.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) write daily reflection papers based upon theological observations in lived experiences (newspaper articles, movies, television, books); 2) write a 5-8 page paper on a particular theological perspective (not limited to Christianity) that has been a growing edge for understanding God from multiple perspectives.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Daniel Migliori, Faith Seeking Understanding.  David Ford, Theology: A Short Introduction.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: LI 224 


ITM 342

THE PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN

JANUARY 2010

L. PURDON   

The course, an extension of the regular curriculum, offers a general introduction to the period of Caribbean piracy following the Discovery and the Conquest. This extension of the curriculum complements historical study devoted to understanding the period of Discovery. What makes this course unique is that it is enhanced by travel to many of the islands that figured prominently either in furthering piracy or in bringing piracy to an end. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Student learning objectives are threefold. The first thing to be gained is knowledge of the geography and meteorology of this watery part of the world where explorers from the Old World first encountered denizens of the New World. Such actual features of this enormous area like the Trade Winds can be easily imagined but take on a whole new meaning when finally experienced. The second thing to be gained consists of general factual information regarding piracy from shortly after the time of the Discovery and Conquest until the end of the eighteenth century. Important in this regard is the historical distinction, for example, between a Buccaneer and a pirate. The final thing to be gained is how the situation in the Caribbean that fostered the rise of piracy may not be all too different from current socio-economic conditions that exist in certain parts of the world. While it may no longer be fashionable to learn about some of the more notable swashbucklers of this period, it will be necessary to resort to biography study at times simply because the circumstances of many of these historical figures' lives determined the kind of piracy they eventually engaged in.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend evening lectures/discussions, 2) read the course text, 3) give presentations.

PREREQUISITE:  Age 21 at time of departure.  All students must have passports.

TEXT:  David Cordingly. Under the Black Flag. New York: Random House, 1995.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Travel costs will include air, ship, transfers, and port taxes. At this time, the approximate cost is $2,225 per person. Owing to the unstable condition of the economy, the price may change. Since early booking insures the lowest price, a refundable deposit will be required of all participants in March 2009.

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2009. 

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor. 


ITM 343

TEACHING IN THAILAND

JANUARY 2010

L. FORESTER & R. DUDLEY   

Teaching in Thailand is a three-week experience in Bangkok, Thailand.  Students work daily in a Thai school teaching English to preschool and middle grades students.  Students are responsible for planning all lessons, working individually and in groups with Thai students, and participating in school-related activities.  In addition to the teaching component of the interterm, students visit historical/religious (Buddhist) sites in and around Bangkok.  Students will also have the opportunity to travel to the beach community of Hua Hin.  This course offers opportunities for the student to understand the culture of Thailand and explore the past and present of this fascinating country. 

This course fulfills the multicultural requirement for Education

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) experience teaching ESL to Thai students; 2) broaden their global perspectives through exploration of Thai history, language, religion, and culture; 3) improve their teaching skill through planning and implementing activities to a non-English speaking audience; 4) have the opportunity to reflect on personal beliefs through participating in a cultural immersion program.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) complete the teaching component of the course; 2) participate in all activities; 3) keep a personal journal; 4) be responsible for one seminar (topics to be assigned prior to departure).

PREREQUISITE:  Education major or special permission

TEXT:  Readings and seminars (two) prior to leaving for Thailand

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $3,100 (covers all transportation to Thailand and in Thailand, housing, and all meals but four dinners).  Students will be responsible for any incidentals, souvenirs, and the four dinners.  (Cost depends on airfares next year.)

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2009. 

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor. 


ITM 346

POLITICAL SCIENCE FICTION

T. HILL

Speculative fiction is often dismissed as having little or nothing meaningful to say about politics, society, or the human condition. This attitude, however, ignores the many works of the genre which use futuristic or fantastic settings as metaphors to comment on the real world. In this class we will explore the politics present in a range of works of speculative fiction and discuss what they have to say about the world we inhabit. Source material may include, but is not limited to, novels, short stories, and films.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the class, students should demonstrate an ability to analyze fiction for its symbolic social and political content, and should be able to communicate this analysis both orally and through writing.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to complete daily readings, write a term paper of significant depth, and participate actively in class discussions.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  To be determined

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  2:00 p.m.

ROOM:  GA 500 


ITM 351

NEW YORK CITY THEATRE EXPERIENCE

MAY 2010

R. MCKERCHER & J. STANDER

The New York Interterm will have two goals. The first goal will be for students to have an internship experience with a company in the city. The internship will be a daily schedule they will set up with a theatre company beforehand, with the assistance of the instructor. The internships do not need to be with a theatre company, although most connections are with the theatre industry. The college has connections to a school for education major placements, and there are connections to other companies Doane alumni are currently working for in the city.  During the second week, students will meet with alumni and tour various theatre companies as well as see the sights of the Big Apple.  Each evening there will be opportunities to see productions on Broadway, Off-Broadway, Off-Off Broadway, The Met, ABT, and perhaps an odd performance art piece.  Students on the 2008 trip saw 12-14 productions including all the Tony winners: 39 Steps, Passing Strange, Gypsy, Macbeth, Avenue Q, and Wicked.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) have a greater understanding of the challenges and opportunities presented by New York City; 2) start to develop professional connections based upon their internships

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will  be required to 1) attend pre-departure meetings; 2) complete a New York internship focused on their field of interest; 3) attend all scheduled group activities; 4) keep a journal.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXT:  None

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $2,350 (covers airfare, housing, cultural events and plays, and subway transportation).  Students will be responsible for their own food costs with the exception of two special meals.

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2009.

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 364

OPERA SCENES

H.J. SMITH AND D. BRECKBILL, ACCOMPANIST

In this course, students will study and prepare excerpts from the masterworks of the operatic repertoire.  Many great European composers - Handel, Mozart, Rossini, Wagner, Verdi, and Puccini, to name a few - specialized in the field of opera.  In the college setting, singers primarily perform opera excerpts in concert or recital.  This course will give students the opportunity to perform this music in a simplified version of its original context: staged as a dramatic scene.  By exploring the intricate connection between music and drama, students will develop a better understanding of the operatic art-form.  This course will culminate in a public performance of the prepared opera scenes near the end of Interterm.  An encore performance early in the second term is anticipated. 

Although preparing opera scenes for performance will be the main focus of this course, it is open as well to any students interested in studying the process of staging opera, even if those students are not singers.  Any such students will be expected to observe rehearsals and to help in preparing the performance in other ways than singing, but will also have the opportunity to read about the process of opera production and to study video recordings of opera productions, permitting them to learn through comparison and evaluation the possibilities and pitfalls of preparing operas for dramatic presentation. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) study, memorize, stage, and perform masterworks of the operatic repertoire; 2) participate in the technical ("backstage crew") aspects of opera production; 3) demonstrate consistent vocal technique and appropriate dramatic interpretation; 4) perform and provide peer evaluation for one another in a master class environment.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend and participate in class everyday; 2) participate in final recital/concert; 3) watch assigned video excerpts and write brief responses; 4) read assigned text excerpts and write brief responses; 5) demonstrate through performance an understanding of consistent vocal production; 6) demonstrate through performance appropriate dramatic interpretation.

PREREQUISITE: 2008-09 or 2009-10 participation in either voice lessons or a Doane choral ensemble (or both) OR permission of the instructor.

TEXTS: Handouts provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM:  CM 21, CM 73, Heckman Auditorium  


ITM 372

FREAKONOMICS

J. BOSSARD

Why are people worse off when they have more options to choose from?  Why are we happy to do some things only if we don't get paid?  Why would more safety features lead to more accidents?  In this class, students will explore why people sometimes make decisions that seem irrational and why some seemingly irrational behavior can have perfectly rational explanations.  Students will also examine the unintended consequences of policy and incentives.  Students will incorporate basic economic principles to describe how we predict people to behave and contrast that with how people actually behave. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will learn basic economic principles and apply them to human behavior and examine why and how people make decisions.  Students will also analyze how this affects resource allocation within society.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class, 2) participate in class discussion, 3) read the assigned readings, 4) write a total of five one-page papers over the daily readings, and 5) write a final paper that applies basic economics to human behavior.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner; Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions by Dan Airely; additional reading provided by the instructor or available online.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: GA 427 


ITM 373

WORLD RELIGIONS AND FILM

D. CLANTON

This course is designed as an exploration of cinematic presentations of the history, beliefs, and practices of major world religious traditions, such as Hinduism; Buddhism; Chinese and Japanese traditions; Judaism; Christianity; Islam; and Indigenous traditions.  Students will engage these traditions through readings, lectures, and discussions prior to viewing cinematic renderings of particular subjects. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon successful completion of the course, students will have 1) developed an understanding of major world religions through readings, lectures, and discussions; 2) viewed, engaged, and discussed several films that present the history, beliefs, and practices of these traditions; 3) developed their own view(s) of the subject matter through reading primary and secondary sources, in-class discussion, and independent research.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class punctually and participate in class discussions; 2) complete assigned readings prior to class; 3) participate in a group presentation on a film not examined in class; 4) complete three response papers on in-class films; and 5) write a final paper.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The Illustrated World's Religions by Huston Smith and other materials assigned by the professor.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: Frees Theater 


ITM 374

SOLVING DR. HOUSE'S MEDICAL MYSTERIES

D. DEYLE

This course will utilize a popular media source, TV's hit show House, MD, to introduce and familiarize students with the basics of the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of interesting, relevant, and socially important medical conditions. However, the content and instruction will be conducted in a way that all students, with prior scientific and medical knowledge or not, can gain an appreciation for the science behind the plots. A different episode will be shown everyday and followed by lecture, discussion, and activities clarifying the material. In addition, several controversial topics in medicine/pharmacy will be examined in the form of group projects/open forum discussions.  

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will gain an 1) understanding of the basic pathophysiology of various clinically relevant medical conditions; 2) understanding of the basic pharmacotherapy of various clinically relevant medical conditions; 3) appreciation of the mode of action, adverse drug effects, and use of medications; 4) appreciation of the organization of the U.S. Healthcare system and comparisons to other models in the world; 5) understanding of various social and economic aspects of current medicinal practice in the U.S.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) view and analyze House, MD episodes; 2) participate in class discussions on social issues affecting medicine and pharmacy 3) write one paper (3-5 pages) on the most important issue affecting the U.S. Healthcare system; 4) give a group presentation on a disease and its treatment; 5) take one test on specified material from class.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Readings, notes, and audiovisual material provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: LI 158 


ITM 375

HUMANS AND PLANTS: THE ROLE PLANTS PLAY IN HUMAN SOCIETIES

B. ELDER

Economic botany is the study of how plants and people interact.  It is an extremely broad discipline that incorporates anthropology, agriculture, and societies.  Students will examine the role plants have played in agriculture, hunting, food gathering, medicine, textiles, and recreation.  This class will look at how plants are used throughout cultures around the world and how the uses of these plants have brought cultures to war. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will gain an understanding of 1) the role of plants in human societies,  2) the history of plant use in agriculture, 3) the current impact of plant use on modern societies.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) write book outlines, 2) give an 8-10 minute PowerPoint presentation, 3) present a final project, 4) take a final examination.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The Botany of Desire: A Plant's Eye View of the World by Michael Pollan, 2002.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM: LI 141 


ITM 376

THE SCIENCE OF KITES!

M. PLANO CLARK   

Kites have been used for at least 2,000 years in a wide variety of human activities. For example, they have been used by the military to keep track of the enemy, by meteorologists to carry instruments aloft (recall Ben Franklin's famous experiment!), by radio operators to support long aerials, to tow both land and sea vehicles, and, of course, for fun. Students completing this course will gain a deeper understanding of force, pressure, and airflow by designing, building, and testing kites. Students will explore different kinds of kites and how lift is produced in each one. Students will conduct experiments to measure pressure differences around a kite and will use that information as a motivation for exploring Bernoulli's Principle in more detail. Students will also gain a needed historical perspective for the use of kites throughout time and by different cultures. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will be able to 1) discuss and apply the basic ideas of force, pressure, and airflow as they relate to kites; 2) design and build a variety of kites and develop criteria for stability; 3) discuss the history and applications of kites; 4) build a variety of kites.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) read articles from a variety of sources to prepare them for class each day, 2) take quizzes over the reading assignments, 3) write a paper that demonstrates their understanding of the history of kites, the principles of flight, and includes a description of all the kites that they build during the term.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/airplane/kitefly.html

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: LI 233 


ITM 377

LET'S RUN A RADIO STATION!

L. THOMAS   

An exploration of, and immersive experience in, the planning, logistics and execution of running an FCC-licensed over-the-air radio station, Doane's KDNE.  Note:  This course is NOT available to students who have previously enrolled in ATV 131 (Radio Station) for credit or no credit or who have been in any way associated with KDNE in a management or staff position in the past.  It is designed for students who have no familiarity with operation of a broadcast facility.  Students will develop a plan to organize, manage, control, and execute programming on KDNE and will serve in the various management and staff (on-air) positions that they create.  In the process, they will learn FCC rules, the use of audio equipment and production software, music scheduling and automation software, development of program formats, and methods of serving the public including public service announcements, news, and public affairs programming.  They will be entirely responsible for running KDNE 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for the duration of the Interterm.  This does not mean that students must be on the air "live," or present at the station all during this period, but they must learn to control, program, and be responsible for the automation system that will run the station when they are not physically present. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students who successfully complete this course will have an understanding of the legal and ethical requirements of running a federally-licensed broadcast facility,  and of the social and political role of a legacy media organization in contemporary democracy; will be able to recognize problems in organization, leadership and planning, and devise solutions to such problems; and/or will be able to engage in successful written and vocal performance to a broadcast audience.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all class meetings, 2) take two exams (one on FCC rules and the other on equipment operation), 3) write a course- and self- evaluation paper based upon performance criteria developed consensually between instructor and students.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Students will be required to read FCC rules, specifically CFR 47, Parts 70-79, software instruction manuals, articles in broadcast trade papers, and the current version of the KDNE Operations Manual.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM: GA 119, GA 213, GA 105 


ITM 378

GREAT MOMENTS IN SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY

E. WILSON   

Students will perform scientific experiments in biology, chemistry, and physics that led to pivotal moments in scientific discovery.  The history and context of these experiments will be explored through reading and discussion, and students will make careful observations and measurements, and judge whether their results would lead them to the same conclusions historically obtained.  This class includes content from multiple disciplines, including the aforementioned sciences and history, in order to put scientific discovery in the context of human society. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will learn through hands-on experience about the discoveries that led us to our current understanding of the universe in which we live.  They will also explore the connection between science and society throughout history.  Finally, students will learn to conduct scientific experiments, including making and recording careful observations and interpreting the meaning of results obtained.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: For each experiment, the class will discuss the historical significance of that activity.  They will keep detailed lab notebooks describing their procedures, observations, and measurements during all experimental procedures.  Finally, students will turn in summaries of each experiment, interpreting their results in the context of the historical period of the original experiment.  There will be one-two exams on course content as well.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Esteban, S.  "Liebig-Wohler Controversy and the Concept of Isomerism."  J. Chem. Ed. 2008 85: 1201-1203.  Napoleon's Buttons: 17 Molecules that Changed History.  By  Penny Le Couteur and Jay Burreson.  Great Scientific Experiments: Twenty Experiments that Changed Our View of the World  by Rom Harre.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: LI 206 


ITM 379

THE PROBABILITY AND HISTORY OF WINNING

B. WOLESENSKY   

The concept of probability and its use in games has an interesting history.  The formal study of probability can be traced back to 1654, where a gamblers dispute provided two mathematicians, Blasé Pascal and Pierre Fermat, with the motivation to begin the study of probability.  Through their correspondence, the foundation for the field of probability was laid. Thus it is only fitting that probability be examined through the study of games, gambling, and history.   

This course will develop the basic probability laws and ideas (i.e., expected payout, law of large numbers) by examining various games of chance, as well as examine these games from a historical perspective. The games will include, but not be limited to: those played on various game shows (for example, Price is Right), lotteries, and casino games.  Students will analyze proposed strategies for "winning" at these games and determine how payouts are decided.  Towards this, students will use simulations to explore probability concepts and various strategies for playing these games.  In addition, students will work in teams to explore the historical/social perspective of games of chance. Towards this, each team will choose a particular country and/or culture and explore how games of chance have evolved in that country and/or culture.  Each team will do a presentation to the class on the results of their research. 

The course will incorporate material from mathematics, history, and sociology.  Furthermore, it will provide a broad liberal arts perspective on gambling and games of chance. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an understanding of the role of probability in a society's leisure activities and history, 2) apply analytical thinking to analyze the effectiveness of game strategies, 3) understand and apply the basic rules of probability to games of chance.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) complete assigned homework activities, 2) give class presentations.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Zen and the Art of Casino Gaming and reading through strategies on http://www.gamblingstrategyguide.com/.

GRADING SYSTEM: Student Option

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM: LI 224 


ITM 380

WAY OUT WEST

MAY 2010

J. GILBERT & T. KING   

This course is a scenic, geographical, historical, artistic, and  musical concert tour of the American Northwest.  This course is open to the Doane College Symphonic Wind Ensemble and other selected members of the Doane Band program not to exceed 45 players.  Music to be performed on this tour will be selections reflecting the American West and Native American culture. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) learn about the history and music of the American West; 2) experience the beauty and grandeur of the American Northwest.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) complete readings from a packet developed by Dr. Gilbert (Music) and Dr. King (History); 2) document their experiences with a journal (written, multimedia); 3) perform eight to ten one-hour concerts.

PREREQUISITE:  Symphonic Wind Ensemble member or selected member of the Doane band program.

TEXT:  Readings packet provided by the instructors.  Several films will be shown and discussed during the tour.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $1,700

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2009. 

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor. 


ITM 381

EXPERIENCING THE LIFE OF A STUDIO ARTIST

E. STEARNS

Art majors will be given the experience to actually live how a studio artist lives.  Students will travel to Professor Stearns studio in Albia, Iowa, where they will be working in a desired medium of choice (painting, drawing, ceramics, sculpture).  They will have to complete a body of work assigned to them along with going to the local high school to conduct a daylong workshop.  The students will also display what they created at an art opening put on by First Iowa State Bank, where the community will be invited to view and talk with those artists. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will learn how to 1) work successfully in a private studio setting; 2) develop and present a workshop; 3) prepare and hang an exhibition.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend one workshop presentation; 2) complete an individual body of work; 3) keep a daily journal; 4) write a final paper.

PREREQUISITE:  Art major or permission

TEXT:  None

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $900 to cover the cost of food, travel, and art supplies.

DEADLINES:  See instructor for details.

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.


ITM 382

EGYPT: A NATION OF CONTRASTS

JANUARY 2010

J. WILLEMS   

In this course, students will travel to Egypt - the land of the Pharaohs and Africa's largest city. 

In Cairo, students will visit museums, religious, cultural, and archeological sights, including the Sphinx and Great Pyramids of Giza, Citadel, Cairo Museum, King Tut exhibit, Khan al Khalili Bazaar, and the Coptic Christian Neighborhood.  A trip to Upper Egypt will include visits to the Karnak and Luxor temples, the Valley of the Kings, and other historical, religious, and archeological sights.  A Nile cruise will also be included.  Students will develop a basic understanding of the history, culture, food, currency of Egypt, and get the chance to use their bargaining skills in Africa's largest market. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) begin to develop confidence, competence, and understanding in a culture other than their own; 2) discover that Egypt is a nation of contrasts as they explore how history affects life in Egypt today; 3) discover how Egypt has developed the ability to accommodate many cultures while embracing its Christian and Islamic heritage. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Prior to departure, each student will be required to

1) attend all pre-departure orientation meetings; 2) research and develop a presentation on a specific topic related to Egypt; 3) develop a simple Arabic travel vocabulary.  While in Egypt, each student will be required to 1) attend daily informational breakfast meetings; 2) present information on their assigned topic; 3) keep a journal of their experience. 

PREREQUISITE:  Permission of the instructor

TEXT:  Students will be required to purchase a required travel guide.  In addition, the instructor will provide a simple Arabic travel vocabulary guide and a notebook of selected readings and informational handouts from each student's presentation. 

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately  $3,650 (includes all accommodations, air and ground transportation to all group activities, admission to group activities, most breakfasts and dinners). We will plan to join with a larger group tour while in Egypt in order to keep the cost per student as low as possible.

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2009. 

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor. 


ITM 383

SPACE: THE FINAL FRONTIER

R. SOUCHEK   

From our small world we have gazed upon the cosmic ocean for thousands of years.  Ancient astronomers observed the moon and points of light in the sky and created myth, wonder, and scientific knowledge.  The years since 1959 have been a golden age of solar system exploration. Advancements in rocketry allowed creation of machines that travel to the moon and other planets.  Humanity has sent automated spacecraft, then human-crewed expeditions, to explore the moon.  These advances permit exploration of topics that will include the history of space exploration after World War II.  This course will also explore application of spacecraft to the search for extraterrestrial life, global warming, and planetary resource investigations (such as weather and air pollution studies) from space.  

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) gain an understanding of the history of space exploration, 2) learn about the various methods of exploring space, 3) become aware of the role of space exploration in the search for extraterrestrial life, investigating global warming, and studying planetary resources from space.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will 1) keep journals, 2) do laboratory experiments, 3) complete an annotated bibliography.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTA History of Space Exploration and its Future, Tim Furniss, The Lyons Press, 2003.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM: LI 158 and LI 106 


CED 205 for 0 credits is available to students who are enrolled in an on-campus 3-hour Interterm course.

CED 205-1 and CED 205-2

INTRODUCTION TO FIELD EXPERIENCE (0)

C. ERSLAND   

An introduction to the field experience. Concerned with 1) helping the student prepare for, initiate, and select the field placement; 2) preparing the learning contract; and 3) understanding/dealing with issues associated with the field experience. 

Through the field experience (internship) students apply knowledge acquired from formal coursework and integrate experiential learning.  This process should result in a better understanding between the two and move the student from being an observer of fieldwork to participant.  Course content will focus on career exploration, job search skills (résumé and cover letter preparation, interviewing techniques, researching industries/companies, agencies), and internship guidelines and procedures.  The student will prepare for a field placement for a future semester (frequently internships are filled 3-5 months in advance). Advanced planning by the student is imperative - DO NOT wait until the semester starts to begin investigating possible internship sites!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) learn how to create and develop a résumé and cover letter to prepare for applying for internships; 2) learn about different types of interviews, interviewing strategies, preparing for the interview, and what to do after the interview; 3) conduct an interview with someone within a job or position of interest and write a paper.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend all four class sessions; 2) satisfactorily complete all assignments.

PREREQUISTE:  None

TEXTS: CED 205 Booklet

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  Two sections - 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m..  Class will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays beginning January 6 and ending January 15.

ROOM:  CM 41 


(DEPARTMENTAL PREFIX/ITM) 290, 390, 490

DIRECTED STUDY

An opportunity for supervised independent research in a specialized area based on the interest of the student.  Credits are to be applied toward degree program.  (Students must enroll in two ITM designated courses during their four years at Doane.  A third interterm requirement may be met by enrolling in a departmentally-designated course.)

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will learn to do independent research.

PREREQUISITE:  Permission of Instructor

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades 


FAR 103

INTRODUCTION TO FINE ARTS: MUSIC

D. FERGUSON

This course is an introduction to the art of music as an expression of the cultures of civilizations, both East and West, through selected examples of music literature.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will gain an understanding of 1) basic elements of music (rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, etc.); 2) a variety of mediums (solo, choir, chamber ensemble, orchestra, etc.); 3) musical form (binary, ternary, sonata, rondo, etc.); 4) periods and styles of music (Baroque, Classical, music of other cultures, jazz, etc.).

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) read assignments from the textbooks; 2) participate in class discussion; 3) listen to musical examples and view recordings of musical performances; 4) take three exams; and 5) attend the Doane Vocal Festival Grand Concert and write a two-page review.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Classical Music for Dummies by David Pogue and Scott Speck

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  CM 22 


HIS 315/ITM 371

THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION

T. KING

Examines the causes, character, and consequences of two great American tragedies: the Civil War and Reconstruction, from the mid-19th century to 1877. Students who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge about the failure of antebellum political mechanisms, the growth of sectionalism, justifications for and against secession, and the methods and implications of war.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an understanding of the causes and the results of the Civil War, and  the reconstruction that followed the war; 2) increase their knowledge and understanding of the Civil War in general, and key historical events and personalities in particular; 3) increase their ability to evaluate ideas and arguments critically, to weigh historical evidence, and to draw conclusions; 4) improve their ability to communicate ideas and arguments concisely, accurately, and informatively orally and in writing.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) watch and prepare various critiques on issues discussed in the video series and the readings; 2) research and make an oral presentation of a key figure or key battle during the Civil War; 3) participate and lead in daily discussions about the video series; 4) attend all class sessions.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The Civil War. The complete text of the bestselling narrative history of the Civil War based on the celebrated PBS television series (Paperback) by Geoffrey C. Ward, Kenneth Burns, and Richard Burns

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  EA 316 


ITM/DEPARTMENTAL PREFIX 421

INTERNSHIP

Contact the Career Development office for more information.

2010

ITM 118

MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION

M. JOHNSON-FARR & D. WEHRS  

In this course, students are presented with information and opportunities to accept and affirm student populations with diversity according to race, ethnicity, religion, gender, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, or special needs.  There are in-class presentations and discussions and field trips to area schools and service agencies. Students will observe and participate in activities with K-12 students. The course will include activities on Sundays with alternatives for students unable to participate with the class. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will enhance their knowledge and understanding of multicultural issues in order to develop a conceptual framework for classroom practice.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will required to 1) attend and be actively involved in all class sessions; 2) complete selected readings out of class for in class sharing; 3) participate in one group presentation on a diversity issue; 4) read and critique one literature piece; 5) complete an alternative activity approved in advance by the instructor if there is a scheduling conflict with class events.

PREREQUISITE: Education major

TEXTS: Assigned readings

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: $100 for admission to sites and other activities

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m. (half and whole days)

ROOM: EA 236/238 

ITM 134

BASKETBALL OFFICIATING

T. HOOD   

This course will offer technical instruction and practical experience with officiating organized basketball.  Discussion-lecture will be offered to familiarize the student with the national federation rules, with appropriate officiating mechanics, and with acceptable positioning for officiating.  Students will also officiate organized scrimmages with critical comments to be offered by the instructor. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an understanding of the basketball rules; 2) be able to apply knowledge of the rules to various real and hypothetical situations; 3) gain an understanding of basketball officiating technique; 4) demonstrate proper officiating technique in controlled scrimmage settings.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class; 2) participate in daily discussion; 3) score a minimum amount of points from 15 quizzes and one major exam; 4) participate in basketball scrimmages; 5) officiate controlled basketball scrimmages; 6) score a minimum amount of points from a practical exam of officiating a basketball scrimmage.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The N.S.A.A. Basketball Officiating Packet. Information for obtaining the packet will be available in the link, ARegistration Requirements/Application Form,@ on the Web site, www.nsaahome.org

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Officiating jersey, whistle, lanyard, and clean basketball shoes.

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  FH 23 & Arena  

ITM 158

MYTH, MUSE AND MATHESIS

J. JOHNSON

This course is intended to be a fun and recreational look at the history of mathematics, mathematicians and their contributions, and will be of special interest to mathematics education majors.  The course will investigate such topics as geometry, bases, algorithms no longer in use for basic operations, tessellations, mental gymnastics, magic squares, problem solving, pi, platonic solids, Pascal triangle, Pythagorean triples, geometric puzzles, fractals, fibonacci numbers, and the golden ratio where it appears in nature.  Students will look at some incidents of famous mathematicians to show their 'humanness' and anecdotes of them to show their eccentricities and frailties. 

This course will give a basic overview of the development of some of mathematics.  It will demonstrate its broad diversity and its exponential growth over the past 3,000 years.  It is intended to look at mathematics not only as the queen of the sciences but also as an art in its own right from a semi-historical perspective. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  This course is designed to show how the history of mathematics 1) can be entertaining, enriching, recreational, rewarding, interesting, and intriguing; 2) can relate to the physical world; 3) can increase the understanding and appreciation of mathematics and other disciplines; 4) can demonstrate why mathematics was created and how; 5) is continually growing, developing and changing.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to write a major paper.  Problem solving will be emphasized by requiring a large set of problems due beyond those assigned daily.  Daily homework will be assigned and graded.  Students will be required to participate in class activities.  Students will also be required to do some library research on various historical topics and perspectives with at least one of those topics to be given as an in class presentation.  A small three-dimensional paper project will also be assigned.  A graphing calculator is strongly recommended.

PREREQUISITE:  An interest in mathematics

TEXTS:  None. Handouts provided by the instructor.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  LI 223 

 

ITM 202

HEIMAT (HOMELAND) - A FAMILY CHRONICLE

P. REINKORDT

A study of the interplay of family and national events in Germany from 1919 to 1982, as well as a student-generated study of the interplay of United States history with their own family's experience during that same period.  Students will explore issues such as the intrusion of world history on personal life, family dynamics - between husband and wife and children and parents/grandparents, social class, regional prejudices, and conflicts between rich and poor.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: The 15-hour film is the example from Germany, and comparing this with their own family chronicle, students may be able to understand that common world events can be viewed from a different cultural perspective.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend and participate actively in all classes; 2) do research on a time line of world events from 1919-1982, comparing these events to their own family history and the impact they had there; 3) write a research paper and enter research findings on an electronic Web conference board; 4) keep a journal; 5) take two examinations.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: Students need to do some or most of their family research before class instruction begins (ideally during Christmas break). Instructor will have a questionnaire available before Thanksgiving break. Local newspaper archives or the State Historical Society in Lincoln are sources for information.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Selections from history texts and library research, family records (if available), one fiction work from the time of 1919-1982 in Germany.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  GA 326   

ITM 227

INTERPRETING THE UNKNOWN: MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCES IN THE 20TH CENTURY

M. ORSAG

"Interpreting the Unknown" will indeed be a key part of this course. How people depict or explain a mysterious event or social phenomenon often presents a revealing insight into their patterns of thought and understanding. Students will be challenged not only to understand mysteries but also to pinpoint hidden questions or meanings that lurk both within the "unknowable" and within human responses to it. The course is organized into six units that are evenly split between factual and fictional disappearances. Unit titles are:  Women, Political Ideology, The Environment, The X-Files, Serial Killers, Future Doomsdays.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will use the phenomenon of disappearance to gain a better understanding of important 20th century trends.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class; 2) participate in class discussions; 3) take an analytical quiz; 4) complete a final project (7-10 page research paper or a group project/presentation).

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: None

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM:  CM 03

 

ITM 230

FROM OPINION TO ARGUMENT

D. MERRITT

This course will enable students to apply critical thinking skills to listening, reading, and writing. Students will learn elements of reasoning, traits of the reasoning mind, universal intellectual standards for reasoning, and how to apply these in any domain where assessment is taking place. They will learn to think consciously, deliberately, and skillfully. The major focus of the course is how to think rather than what to think.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students successfully completing this course should be able to evaluate information for its relevance, identify assumptions with greater accuracy, construct plausible inferences, and apply elements of sound critical thinking.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Student teams will be responsible for leading two class discussions on current issues of their choice. A written analysis of the issue selected will be due at the time of its presentation.  Each student will be required to keep a journal that critically analyzes their own educational experience.  (Only the instructor will review these journal entries, and all journals will be returned to the students upon completion of the course.)

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Paul, Richard (1993). Critical Thinking: What every person needs to survive in a rapidly changing world. Foundation for Critical Thinking, Santa Rosa: CA.

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  GA 500   

ITM 277

ROBOlympics

A. ENGEBRETSON

In this course, students will work in teams to design, build, and program simple robots, using Lego Mindstorms robotics kits.  Students will experiment with robotic motion, behavior programming, sensors, and vision.  Students will construct pre-designed "training" robots, then use their experience to design, build, and program machines of their own creation.  The course will culminate in a ROBOlympics where teams of students pit their final robot designs against each other.  Students will document their designs, using the written word, digital photography, and digital video media, to produce Web-based documentation of their final robots.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will achieve a basic understanding of the various elements of robotics, for example, the physical components required, methods of movement, sensor techniques, and behavior programming.  Students will also gain experience in scientific documentation, through the documentation of their designs.  The documentation work will also expose students to aspects of Web page development.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class, 2) in teams, build working instances of the training robots, 3)  in teams, design, build and program original robots to participate in the ROBOlympics, 4) produce step-by-step, Web-based documentation detailing the construction and operation of their final robot designs.

PREREQUISITE: None.  No prior experience with robots or programming is necessary!

TEXTS: Handouts provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: LI 238 & 240 

ITM 293

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EVIL

B. PAUWELS

Using primarily a psychological perspective, this course will investigate the various factors that contribute to instances of human cruelty and brutality. Through readings, videos, and class discussion, students will study the human tendency to think in terms of Agood vs. evil,@ and critically examine the validity, usefulness, and consequences of such thinking. Topics such as terrorism, interracial violence, organized crime, serial killers, and war will be addressed.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an understanding of some of the basic psychological mechanisms behind the behavior of both victims and perpetrators of violence; 2) be able to effectively articulate the advantages and disadvantages of categorizing human behaviors/events as Agood" or Aevil@; 3) gain an understanding of the factors that influence individuals= beliefs about whether others are Agood@ or Aevil.@

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) actively participate in class discussion; 2) successfully complete several short assignments and/or quizzes based on assigned readings; 3) successfully complete one examination.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Baumeister, Roy (1999). Evil: Inside Human Violence and Cruelty. New York: W.H. Freeman and Co. (paperback version).  This primary text will be supplemented with additional assigned readings that will be made available to students through the college library.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  CM 40   

ITM 300

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

T. KAY

This class is designed to teach individuals how to communicate with the deaf.  Emphasis is placed on the following communications modes: gestures, finger spelling, and sign language.   

This course does not satisfy the Cultural Perspectives requirement of the Doane Plan

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will be able to 1) define modes of communication; 2) read finger spelling; 3) sign before the class; 4) demonstrate the proper formation of letters and signs.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class and participate in small groups; 2) sign sentences and short stories in class; 3) complete written assignment on American Sign Language or a biographical sketch of a deaf person; 4) take three quizzes; 5) read sign language from video tapes.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: A Basic Course in American Sign Language by Tom Humphries, Carol Padden, and Terrence J. O'Rouke

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM: EA 242   

ITM 315

MICHELANGELO TO MOZART: EXPLORING ITALY AND AUSTRIA

MAY 2010

R. DIERCKS   

This two-week interterm in Italy and Austria is designed to provide experiences that introduce students to the magnificent cities, geography, and culture of these two countries.  These two countries have made tremendous contributions to art, music, and culture around the world. Michelangelo and Mozart will be featured throughout the experience.  Students will explore cathedrals, castles, ruins, monuments, food, and historic places in central and northern Italy and most of Austria.  During the trip, students will learn about the culture, architecture, art, music and history of Italy and Austria.  Students will visit major cities and small historic towns in both countries.  They will tour museums, cathedrals, castles, and gardens.  Other experiences include guided walking tours where students will see schools, art galleries, and modern and historic shops.  Day trips to nearby historic and quaint small towns and villages will provide a broader perspective of the land and the people in Italy and Austria.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) gain a better understanding of the complex nature of the Italian and Austrian cultures both past and present; 2) be able to compare artistic, historical, and educational experiences of Italy and Austria to those in the United States.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend all scheduled orientations and activities prior to and during the trip; 2) complete all assigned readings; 3) keep a daily journal; 4) work in small groups to present information on selected topics related to their experiences in Italy and Austria; 5) obtain a passport; 6) obtain visas if necessary.

PREREQUISITE:  Permission of the instructor

TEXT:  Articles and handouts provided by the instructor as well as travel guides to Italy and Austria.  Brochures and other related material that are acquired during the trip.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $3,000 (includes airfare, lodging, guided bus and walking tours, entrance fees to places visited, breakfast and evening meal each day).  The first deposit (a minimum of 10% of the course costs (or $300.00) by September 10 or earlier. A second deposit of $1,000 is due December 1. The final payment of approximately $1,700 is due February 15, 2010.

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2009. 

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.   

 

ITM 319

LEADING THE WAY TO CHANGE

C. PETR

The Doane College purpose is to educate students to serve and to lead in the state, nation, and the world.  This course will provide students with an introduction to leadership theories and models, offer students the opportunity to evaluate and understand their own leadership potential, and give students the chance to practice the skills needed to lead oneself and others.  The course will focus on "the premise that leadership is a relational process of people working together to accomplish change or to make a difference that will benefit the common good."  It will also be stressed that anyone can be part of the leadership process, whether as a formal leader or as an active, committed member.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an understanding of the traditional and contemporary theories of leadership; 2) recognize one's own leadership potential and capacity for change; 3) develop the skills necessary to be an effective leader; 4) gain an understanding of the importance of relationships in creating and implementing change.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) participate in class interaction and discussion; 2) complete a 3-5-page paper; 3) create a visual representation of one's leadership journey; 4) give a group presentation.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Komives, S., Lucas N. and McMahon, T. Exploring Leadership For College Students Who Want to Make a Difference, Jossey-Bass Publishers, San Francisco, 1998.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: $25.00 for retreat costs and materials

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: EA 307 

ITM 321

IN PURSUIT OF SUSTAINABLE LIVING

L. KALBACH

This course will explore the idea of "sustainable" living by investigating how people can change consumptive behaviors detrimental to the environment, animals, and the welfare of one's-self and other human beings.  An emphasis will be placed on analyzing societal messages that encourage humans to behave in detrimental ways, particularly media images promoting conspicuous consumption.  A particular focus will be paid to the role of such consumption in the current economic crisis and recovery.  Students will investigate the difficulties in countering such messages personally and on a societal basis.  Students will engage in two projects, one service-learning and one final project to develop a personal action plan to begin transforming their personal behavior.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) engage in media literacy activities; 2) engage in personal analysis and reflection; 3) explore subliminal messages and their impact on human behavior over time; 4) explore ideas in sustainable economics and personal living; 5) explore the mergence of social entrepreneurial developments locally, nationally, and globally; 6) use service-learning and social media to promote social action.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all class sessions and engage in positive group collaboration; 2) complete all class assignments, activities, and a final project; 3) participate and complete a service-learning project.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The Sustainability Revolution: Portrait of a Paradigm Shift (2005) Andrews R. Edwards

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: EA 242   

ITM 326

BUZZING, BLOWING, AND BOPPING: THE PHYSICAL BASIS OF MUSIC

C. WENTWORTH

Virtually all people are attracted to making and listening to music.  But how are the limitless variety of pleasing sounds produced by the voice or musical instruments?  In this course, students will use simple physical principles to describe sounds from several kinds of instruments, including the human voice.  Students will investigate questions such as

  • Why do different instruments have their unique sound?
  • How do different human voices produce singing?
  • How does the human ear actually hear sounds?

These questions will be investigated using many hands-on activities.  Students will also build a variety of musical instruments from simple materials. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will be able to 1) use basic physics principles required to describe waves and sound; 2) obtain sound data from musical instruments using appropriate sound analysis software; 3) describe the sounds that different kinds of instruments make using scientific principles; 4) describe how human voice produces sound; 5) describe how the human ear perceives sound; 6) build simple musical instruments.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) perform all laboratory and hands-on activities; 2) participate in class discussions; 3) complete Web-based readings and homework assignments; 4) take four quizzes; 5) write a paper on a musical instrument.

PREREQUISITE: Completion of the Doane Basic Mathematical Skills requirement (score 19 or higher on the ACT, pass Doane's Computational Skills Test, or complete MTH/DSS 090 with a grade of C- or higher).

TEXTS: A variety of sources available on the Web

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM: LI 233 

 

ITM 340

FAITH SEEKING UNDERSTANDING

K. COOPER   

The purpose of this course to is to help the student to think theologically.  The course will focus on the nature and interconnections among various traditions that are central to faith and praxis.  It will engage various theological perspectives across multiple traditions and across the world.  It will use this method of comparison as a means to help the student develop critical understanding of how their own theological beliefs hang together in a framework and how that framework can be in dialogue with other frameworks.  Students will gain an understanding of the connections between the three major monotheistic traditions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam) as well as Buddhism and Hinduism.  They will explore in particular  Liberation Theology (Latin America), Black Liberation Theology, Asian Feminist Theology, Womanist Theology, Theology from Below (Third World) 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) build a theological vocabulary for articulating beliefs; 2) become acquainted with different approaches to various doctrines and develop his/her skills at evaluating implications of their theological assumptions; 3) develop personal constructive theological view points through dialogue with readings, lectures, and class discussions.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) write daily reflection papers based upon theological observations in lived experiences (newspaper articles, movies, television, books); 2) write a 5-8 page paper on a particular theological perspective (not limited to Christianity) that has been a growing edge for understanding God from multiple perspectives.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Daniel Migliori, Faith Seeking Understanding.  David Ford, Theology: A Short Introduction.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: LI 224   

 

ITM 342

THE PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN

JANUARY 2010

L. PURDON   

The course, an extension of the regular curriculum, offers a general introduction to the period of Caribbean piracy following the Discovery and the Conquest. This extension of the curriculum complements historical study devoted to understanding the period of Discovery. What makes this course unique is that it is enhanced by travel to many of the islands that figured prominently either in furthering piracy or in bringing piracy to an end. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Student learning objectives are threefold. The first thing to be gained is knowledge of the geography and meteorology of this watery part of the world where explorers from the Old World first encountered denizens of the New World. Such actual features of this enormous area like the Trade Winds can be easily imagined but take on a whole new meaning when finally experienced. The second thing to be gained consists of general factual information regarding piracy from shortly after the time of the Discovery and Conquest until the end of the eighteenth century. Important in this regard is the historical distinction, for example, between a Buccaneer and a pirate. The final thing to be gained is how the situation in the Caribbean that fostered the rise of piracy may not be all too different from current socio-economic conditions that exist in certain parts of the world. While it may no longer be fashionable to learn about some of the more notable swashbucklers of this period, it will be necessary to resort to biography study at times simply because the circumstances of many of these historical figures' lives determined the kind of piracy they eventually engaged in.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend evening lectures/discussions, 2) read the course text, 3) give presentations.

PREREQUISITE:  Age 21 at time of departure.  All students must have passports.

TEXT:  David Cordingly. Under the Black Flag. New York: Random House, 1995.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: Travel costs will include air, ship, transfers, and port taxes. At this time, the approximate cost is $2,225 per person. Owing to the unstable condition of the economy, the price may change. Since early booking insures the lowest price, a refundable deposit will be required of all participants in March 2009.

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2009. 

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.   

 

ITM 343

TEACHING IN THAILAND

JANUARY 2010

L. FORESTER & R. DUDLEY   

Teaching in Thailand is a three-week experience in Bangkok, Thailand.  Students work daily in a Thai school teaching English to preschool and middle grades students.  Students are responsible for planning all lessons, working individually and in groups with Thai students, and participating in school-related activities.  In addition to the teaching component of the interterm, students visit historical/religious (Buddhist) sites in and around Bangkok.  Students will also have the opportunity to travel to the beach community of Hua Hin.  This course offers opportunities for the student to understand the culture of Thailand and explore the past and present of this fascinating country. 

This course fulfills the multicultural requirement for Education

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) experience teaching ESL to Thai students; 2) broaden their global perspectives through exploration of Thai history, language, religion, and culture; 3) improve their teaching skill through planning and implementing activities to a non-English speaking audience; 4) have the opportunity to reflect on personal beliefs through participating in a cultural immersion program.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) complete the teaching component of the course; 2) participate in all activities; 3) keep a personal journal; 4) be responsible for one seminar (topics to be assigned prior to departure).

PREREQUISITE:  Education major or special permission

TEXT:  Readings and seminars (two) prior to leaving for Thailand

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $3,100 (covers all transportation to Thailand and in Thailand, housing, and all meals but four dinners).  Students will be responsible for any incidentals, souvenirs, and the four dinners.  (Cost depends on airfares next year.)

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2009. 

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.   

 

ITM 346

POLITICAL SCIENCE FICTION

T. HILL

Speculative fiction is often dismissed as having little or nothing meaningful to say about politics, society, or the human condition. This attitude, however, ignores the many works of the genre which use futuristic or fantastic settings as metaphors to comment on the real world. In this class we will explore the politics present in a range of works of speculative fiction and discuss what they have to say about the world we inhabit. Source material may include, but is not limited to, novels, short stories, and films.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  By the end of the class, students should demonstrate an ability to analyze fiction for its symbolic social and political content, and should be able to communicate this analysis both orally and through writing.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to complete daily readings, write a term paper of significant depth, and participate actively in class discussions.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTS:  To be determined

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  2:00 p.m.

ROOM:  GA 500   

ITM 351

NEW YORK CITY THEATRE EXPERIENCE

MAY 2010

R. MCKERCHER & J. STANDER

The New York Interterm will have two goals. The first goal will be for students to have an internship experience with a company in the city. The internship will be a daily schedule they will set up with a theatre company beforehand, with the assistance of the instructor. The internships do not need to be with a theatre company, although most connections are with the theatre industry. The college has connections to a school for education major placements, and there are connections to other companies Doane alumni are currently working for in the city.  During the second week, students will meet with alumni and tour various theatre companies as well as see the sights of the Big Apple.  Each evening there will be opportunities to see productions on Broadway, Off-Broadway, Off-Off Broadway, The Met, ABT, and perhaps an odd performance art piece.  Students on the 2008 trip saw 12-14 productions including all the Tony winners: 39 Steps, Passing Strange, Gypsy, Macbeth, Avenue Q, and Wicked.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) have a greater understanding of the challenges and opportunities presented by New York City; 2) start to develop professional connections based upon their internships

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will  be required to 1) attend pre-departure meetings; 2) complete a New York internship focused on their field of interest; 3) attend all scheduled group activities; 4) keep a journal.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXT:  None

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $2,350 (covers airfare, housing, cultural events and plays, and subway transportation).  Students will be responsible for their own food costs with the exception of two special meals.

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2009.

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.

ITM 364

OPERA SCENES

H.J. SMITH AND D. BRECKBILL, ACCOMPANIST

In this course, students will study and prepare excerpts from the masterworks of the operatic repertoire.  Many great European composers - Handel, Mozart, Rossini, Wagner, Verdi, and Puccini, to name a few - specialized in the field of opera.  In the college setting, singers primarily perform opera excerpts in concert or recital.  This course will give students the opportunity to perform this music in a simplified version of its original context: staged as a dramatic scene.  By exploring the intricate connection between music and drama, students will develop a better understanding of the operatic art-form.  This course will culminate in a public performance of the prepared opera scenes near the end of Interterm.  An encore performance early in the second term is anticipated. 

Although preparing opera scenes for performance will be the main focus of this course, it is open as well to any students interested in studying the process of staging opera, even if those students are not singers.  Any such students will be expected to observe rehearsals and to help in preparing the performance in other ways than singing, but will also have the opportunity to read about the process of opera production and to study video recordings of opera productions, permitting them to learn through comparison and evaluation the possibilities and pitfalls of preparing operas for dramatic presentation. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) study, memorize, stage, and perform masterworks of the operatic repertoire; 2) participate in the technical ("backstage crew") aspects of opera production; 3) demonstrate consistent vocal technique and appropriate dramatic interpretation; 4) perform and provide peer evaluation for one another in a master class environment.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend and participate in class everyday; 2) participate in final recital/concert; 3) watch assigned video excerpts and write brief responses; 4) read assigned text excerpts and write brief responses; 5) demonstrate through performance an understanding of consistent vocal production; 6) demonstrate through performance appropriate dramatic interpretation.

PREREQUISITE: 2008-09 or 2009-10 participation in either voice lessons or a Doane choral ensemble (or both) OR permission of the instructor.

TEXTS: Handouts provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM:  CM 21, CM 73, Heckman Auditorium  

 

ITM 372

FREAKONOMICS

J. BOSSARD

Why are people worse off when they have more options to choose from?  Why are we happy to do some things only if we don't get paid?  Why would more safety features lead to more accidents?  In this class, students will explore why people sometimes make decisions that seem irrational and why some seemingly irrational behavior can have perfectly rational explanations.  Students will also examine the unintended consequences of policy and incentives.  Students will incorporate basic economic principles to describe how we predict people to behave and contrast that with how people actually behave. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will learn basic economic principles and apply them to human behavior and examine why and how people make decisions.  Students will also analyze how this affects resource allocation within society.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class, 2) participate in class discussion, 3) read the assigned readings, 4) write a total of five one-page papers over the daily readings, and 5) write a final paper that applies basic economics to human behavior.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner; Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions by Dan Airely; additional reading provided by the instructor or available online.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: GA 427   

ITM 373

WORLD RELIGIONS AND FILM

D. CLANTON

This course is designed as an exploration of cinematic presentations of the history, beliefs, and practices of major world religious traditions, such as Hinduism; Buddhism; Chinese and Japanese traditions; Judaism; Christianity; Islam; and Indigenous traditions.  Students will engage these traditions through readings, lectures, and discussions prior to viewing cinematic renderings of particular subjects. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon successful completion of the course, students will have 1) developed an understanding of major world religions through readings, lectures, and discussions; 2) viewed, engaged, and discussed several films that present the history, beliefs, and practices of these traditions; 3) developed their own view(s) of the subject matter through reading primary and secondary sources, in-class discussion, and independent research.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend class punctually and participate in class discussions; 2) complete assigned readings prior to class; 3) participate in a group presentation on a film not examined in class; 4) complete three response papers on in-class films; and 5) write a final paper.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The Illustrated World's Religions by Huston Smith and other materials assigned by the professor.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: Frees Theater 

ITM 374

SOLVING DR. HOUSE'S MEDICAL MYSTERIES

D. DEYLE

This course will utilize a popular media source, TV's hit show House, MD, to introduce and familiarize students with the basics of the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of interesting, relevant, and socially important medical conditions. However, the content and instruction will be conducted in a way that all students, with prior scientific and medical knowledge or not, can gain an appreciation for the science behind the plots. A different episode will be shown everyday and followed by lecture, discussion, and activities clarifying the material. In addition, several controversial topics in medicine/pharmacy will be examined in the form of group projects/open forum discussions.  

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will gain an 1) understanding of the basic pathophysiology of various clinically relevant medical conditions; 2) understanding of the basic pharmacotherapy of various clinically relevant medical conditions; 3) appreciation of the mode of action, adverse drug effects, and use of medications; 4) appreciation of the organization of the U.S. Healthcare system and comparisons to other models in the world; 5) understanding of various social and economic aspects of current medicinal practice in the U.S.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) view and analyze House, MD episodes; 2) participate in class discussions on social issues affecting medicine and pharmacy 3) write one paper (3-5 pages) on the most important issue affecting the U.S. Healthcare system; 4) give a group presentation on a disease and its treatment; 5) take one test on specified material from class.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Readings, notes, and audiovisual material provided by the instructor

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: LI 158 

 

ITM 375

HUMANS AND PLANTS: THE ROLE PLANTS PLAY IN HUMAN SOCIETIES

B. ELDER

Economic botany is the study of how plants and people interact.  It is an extremely broad discipline that incorporates anthropology, agriculture, and societies.  Students will examine the role plants have played in agriculture, hunting, food gathering, medicine, textiles, and recreation.  This class will look at how plants are used throughout cultures around the world and how the uses of these plants have brought cultures to war. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will gain an understanding of 1) the role of plants in human societies,  2) the history of plant use in agriculture, 3) the current impact of plant use on modern societies.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) write book outlines, 2) give an 8-10 minute PowerPoint presentation, 3) present a final project, 4) take a final examination.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The Botany of Desire: A Plant's Eye View of the World by Michael Pollan, 2002.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM: LI 141   

ITM 376

THE SCIENCE OF KITES!

M. PLANO CLARK   

Kites have been used for at least 2,000 years in a wide variety of human activities. For example, they have been used by the military to keep track of the enemy, by meteorologists to carry instruments aloft (recall Ben Franklin's famous experiment!), by radio operators to support long aerials, to tow both land and sea vehicles, and, of course, for fun. Students completing this course will gain a deeper understanding of force, pressure, and airflow by designing, building, and testing kites. Students will explore different kinds of kites and how lift is produced in each one. Students will conduct experiments to measure pressure differences around a kite and will use that information as a motivation for exploring Bernoulli's Principle in more detail. Students will also gain a needed historical perspective for the use of kites throughout time and by different cultures. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will be able to 1) discuss and apply the basic ideas of force, pressure, and airflow as they relate to kites; 2) design and build a variety of kites and develop criteria for stability; 3) discuss the history and applications of kites; 4) build a variety of kites.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) read articles from a variety of sources to prepare them for class each day, 2) take quizzes over the reading assignments, 3) write a paper that demonstrates their understanding of the history of kites, the principles of flight, and includes a description of all the kites that they build during the term.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/airplane/kitefly.html

GRADING SYSTEM: Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: LI 233   

 

ITM 377

LET'S RUN A RADIO STATION!

L. THOMAS   

An exploration of, and immersive experience in, the planning, logistics and execution of running an FCC-licensed over-the-air radio station, Doane's KDNE.  Note:  This course is NOT available to students who have previously enrolled in ATV 131 (Radio Station) for credit or no credit or who have been in any way associated with KDNE in a management or staff position in the past.  It is designed for students who have no familiarity with operation of a broadcast facility.  Students will develop a plan to organize, manage, control, and execute programming on KDNE and will serve in the various management and staff (on-air) positions that they create.  In the process, they will learn FCC rules, the use of audio equipment and production software, music scheduling and automation software, development of program formats, and methods of serving the public including public service announcements, news, and public affairs programming.  They will be entirely responsible for running KDNE 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for the duration of the Interterm.  This does not mean that students must be on the air "live," or present at the station all during this period, but they must learn to control, program, and be responsible for the automation system that will run the station when they are not physically present. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students who successfully complete this course will have an understanding of the legal and ethical requirements of running a federally-licensed broadcast facility,  and of the social and political role of a legacy media organization in contemporary democracy; will be able to recognize problems in organization, leadership and planning, and devise solutions to such problems; and/or will be able to engage in successful written and vocal performance to a broadcast audience.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) attend all class meetings, 2) take two exams (one on FCC rules and the other on equipment operation), 3) write a course- and self- evaluation paper based upon performance criteria developed consensually between instructor and students.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Students will be required to read FCC rules, specifically CFR 47, Parts 70-79, software instruction manuals, articles in broadcast trade papers, and the current version of the KDNE Operations Manual.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM: GA 119, GA 213, GA 105  

 

ITM 378

GREAT MOMENTS IN SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY

E. WILSON   

Students will perform scientific experiments in biology, chemistry, and physics that led to pivotal moments in scientific discovery.  The history and context of these experiments will be explored through reading and discussion, and students will make careful observations and measurements, and judge whether their results would lead them to the same conclusions historically obtained.  This class includes content from multiple disciplines, including the aforementioned sciences and history, in order to put scientific discovery in the context of human society. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will learn through hands-on experience about the discoveries that led us to our current understanding of the universe in which we live.  They will also explore the connection between science and society throughout history.  Finally, students will learn to conduct scientific experiments, including making and recording careful observations and interpreting the meaning of results obtained.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: For each experiment, the class will discuss the historical significance of that activity.  They will keep detailed lab notebooks describing their procedures, observations, and measurements during all experimental procedures.  Finally, students will turn in summaries of each experiment, interpreting their results in the context of the historical period of the original experiment.  There will be one-two exams on course content as well.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Esteban, S.  "Liebig-Wohler Controversy and the Concept of Isomerism."  J. Chem. Ed. 2008 85: 1201-1203.  Napoleon's Buttons: 17 Molecules that Changed History.  By  Penny Le Couteur and Jay Burreson.  Great Scientific Experiments: Twenty Experiments that Changed Our View of the World  by Rom Harre.

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM: LI 206   

 

ITM 379

THE PROBABILITY AND HISTORY OF WINNING

B. WOLESENSKY   

The concept of probability and its use in games has an interesting history.  The formal study of probability can be traced back to 1654, where a gamblers dispute provided two mathematicians, Blasé Pascal and Pierre Fermat, with the motivation to begin the study of probability.  Through their correspondence, the foundation for the field of probability was laid. Thus it is only fitting that probability be examined through the study of games, gambling, and history.   

This course will develop the basic probability laws and ideas (i.e., expected payout, law of large numbers) by examining various games of chance, as well as examine these games from a historical perspective. The games will include, but not be limited to: those played on various game shows (for example, Price is Right), lotteries, and casino games.  Students will analyze proposed strategies for "winning" at these games and determine how payouts are decided.  Towards this, students will use simulations to explore probability concepts and various strategies for playing these games.  In addition, students will work in teams to explore the historical/social perspective of games of chance. Towards this, each team will choose a particular country and/or culture and explore how games of chance have evolved in that country and/or culture.  Each team will do a presentation to the class on the results of their research. 

The course will incorporate material from mathematics, history, and sociology.  Furthermore, it will provide a broad liberal arts perspective on gambling and games of chance. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an understanding of the role of probability in a society's leisure activities and history, 2) apply analytical thinking to analyze the effectiveness of game strategies, 3) understand and apply the basic rules of probability to games of chance.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) complete assigned homework activities, 2) give class presentations.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Zen and the Art of Casino Gaming and reading through strategies on http://www.gamblingstrategyguide.com/.

GRADING SYSTEM: Student Option

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM: LI 224   

 

ITM 380

WAY OUT WEST

MAY 2010

J. GILBERT & T. KING   

This course is a scenic, geographical, historical, artistic, and  musical concert tour of the American Northwest.  This course is open to the Doane College Symphonic Wind Ensemble and other selected members of the Doane Band program not to exceed 45 players.  Music to be performed on this tour will be selections reflecting the American West and Native American culture. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) learn about the history and music of the American West; 2) experience the beauty and grandeur of the American Northwest.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) complete readings from a packet developed by Dr. Gilbert (Music) and Dr. King (History); 2) document their experiences with a journal (written, multimedia); 3) perform eight to ten one-hour concerts.

PREREQUISITE:  Symphonic Wind Ensemble member or selected member of the Doane band program.

TEXT:  Readings packet provided by the instructors.  Several films will be shown and discussed during the tour.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $1,700

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2009. 

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.   

ITM 381

EXPERIENCING THE LIFE OF A STUDIO ARTIST

E. STEARNS

Art majors will be given the experience to actually live how a studio artist lives.  Students will travel to Professor Stearns studio in Albia, Iowa, where they will be working in a desired medium of choice (painting, drawing, ceramics, sculpture).  They will have to complete a body of work assigned to them along with going to the local high school to conduct a daylong workshop.  The students will also display what they created at an art opening put on by First Iowa State Bank, where the community will be invited to view and talk with those artists. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will learn how to 1) work successfully in a private studio setting; 2) develop and present a workshop; 3) prepare and hang an exhibition.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend one workshop presentation; 2) complete an individual body of work; 3) keep a daily journal; 4) write a final paper.

PREREQUISITE:  Art major or permission

TEXT:  None

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately $900 to cover the cost of food, travel, and art supplies.

DEADLINES:  See instructor for details.

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor.

 

ITM 382

EGYPT: A NATION OF CONTRASTS

JANUARY 2010

J. WILLEMS   

In this course, students will travel to Egypt - the land of the Pharaohs and Africa's largest city. 

In Cairo, students will visit museums, religious, cultural, and archeological sights, including the Sphinx and Great Pyramids of Giza, Citadel, Cairo Museum, King Tut exhibit, Khan al Khalili Bazaar, and the Coptic Christian Neighborhood.  A trip to Upper Egypt will include visits to the Karnak and Luxor temples, the Valley of the Kings, and other historical, religious, and archeological sights.  A Nile cruise will also be included.  Students will develop a basic understanding of the history, culture, food, currency of Egypt, and get the chance to use their bargaining skills in Africa's largest market. 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) begin to develop confidence, competence, and understanding in a culture other than their own; 2) discover that Egypt is a nation of contrasts as they explore how history affects life in Egypt today; 3) discover how Egypt has developed the ability to accommodate many cultures while embracing its Christian and Islamic heritage. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Prior to departure, each student will be required to

1) attend all pre-departure orientation meetings; 2) research and develop a presentation on a specific topic related to Egypt; 3) develop a simple Arabic travel vocabulary.  While in Egypt, each student will be required to 1) attend daily informational breakfast meetings; 2) present information on their assigned topic; 3) keep a journal of their experience. 

PREREQUISITE:  Permission of the instructor

TEXT:  Students will be required to purchase a required travel guide.  In addition, the instructor will provide a simple Arabic travel vocabulary guide and a notebook of selected readings and informational handouts from each student's presentation. 

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  Approximately  $3,650 (includes all accommodations, air and ground transportation to all group activities, admission to group activities, most breakfasts and dinners). We will plan to join with a larger group tour while in Egypt in order to keep the cost per student as low as possible.

DEADLINES:  Deposit due in the Business Office by September 10, 2009. 

Note:  Travel Scholarship monies apply to this interterm.  Details concerning eligibility and final cost will be supplied by the instructor. 

 

ITM 383

SPACE: THE FINAL FRONTIER

R. SOUCHEK   

From our small world we have gazed upon the cosmic ocean for thousands of years.  Ancient astronomers observed the moon and points of light in the sky and created myth, wonder, and scientific knowledge.  The years since 1959 have been a golden age of solar system exploration. Advancements in rocketry allowed creation of machines that travel to the moon and other planets.  Humanity has sent automated spacecraft, then human-crewed expeditions, to explore the moon.  These advances permit exploration of topics that will include the history of space exploration after World War II.  This course will also explore application of spacecraft to the search for extraterrestrial life, global warming, and planetary resource investigations (such as weather and air pollution studies) from space.  

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) gain an understanding of the history of space exploration, 2) learn about the various methods of exploring space, 3) become aware of the role of space exploration in the search for extraterrestrial life, investigating global warming, and studying planetary resources from space.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will 1) keep journals, 2) do laboratory experiments, 3) complete an annotated bibliography.

PREREQUISITE:  None

TEXTA History of Space Exploration and its Future, Tim Furniss, The Lyons Press, 2003.

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 2:00 p.m.

ROOM: LI 158 and LI 106  

 

CED 205 for 0 credits is available to students who are enrolled in an on-campus 3-hour Interterm course.

CED 205-1 and CED 205-2

INTRODUCTION TO FIELD EXPERIENCE (0)

C. ERSLAND   

An introduction to the field experience. Concerned with 1) helping the student prepare for, initiate, and select the field placement; 2) preparing the learning contract; and 3) understanding/dealing with issues associated with the field experience. 

Through the field experience (internship) students apply knowledge acquired from formal coursework and integrate experiential learning.  This process should result in a better understanding between the two and move the student from being an observer of fieldwork to participant.  Course content will focus on career exploration, job search skills (résumé and cover letter preparation, interviewing techniques, researching industries/companies, agencies), and internship guidelines and procedures.  The student will prepare for a field placement for a future semester (frequently internships are filled 3-5 months in advance). Advanced planning by the student is imperative - DO NOT wait until the semester starts to begin investigating possible internship sites!

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will 1) learn how to create and develop a résumé and cover letter to prepare for applying for internships; 2) learn about different types of interviews, interviewing strategies, preparing for the interview, and what to do after the interview; 3) conduct an interview with someone within a job or position of interest and write a paper.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:  Students will be required to 1) attend all four class sessions; 2) satisfactorily complete all assignments.

PREREQUISTE:  None

TEXTS: CED 205 Booklet

GRADING SYSTEM:  Pass/Fail

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS:  None

CLASS MEETING TIME:  Two sections - 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m..  Class will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays beginning January 6 and ending January 15.

ROOM:  CM 41 

(DEPARTMENTAL PREFIX/ITM) 290, 390, 490

DIRECTED STUDY

An opportunity for supervised independent research in a specialized area based on the interest of the student.  Credits are to be applied toward degree program.  (Students must enroll in two ITM designated courses during their four years at Doane.  A third interterm requirement may be met by enrolling in a departmentally-designated course.)

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Students will learn to do independent research.

PREREQUISITE:  Permission of Instructor

GRADING SYSTEM:  Letter Grades  

 

FAR 103

INTRODUCTION TO FINE ARTS: MUSIC

D. FERGUSON

This course is an introduction to the art of music as an expression of the cultures of civilizations, both East and West, through selected examples of music literature.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will gain an understanding of 1) basic elements of music (rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, etc.); 2) a variety of mediums (solo, choir, chamber ensemble, orchestra, etc.); 3) musical form (binary, ternary, sonata, rondo, etc.); 4) periods and styles of music (Baroque, Classical, music of other cultures, jazz, etc.).

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) read assignments from the textbooks; 2) participate in class discussion; 3) listen to musical examples and view recordings of musical performances; 4) take three exams; and 5) attend the Doane Vocal Festival Grand Concert and write a two-page review.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: Classical Music for Dummies by David Pogue and Scott Speck

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  CM 22 

HIS 315/ITM 371

THE CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION

T. KING

Examines the causes, character, and consequences of two great American tragedies: the Civil War and Reconstruction, from the mid-19th century to 1877. Students who successfully complete this course will demonstrate knowledge about the failure of antebellum political mechanisms, the growth of sectionalism, justifications for and against secession, and the methods and implications of war.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will 1) gain an understanding of the causes and the results of the Civil War, and  the reconstruction that followed the war; 2) increase their knowledge and understanding of the Civil War in general, and key historical events and personalities in particular; 3) increase their ability to evaluate ideas and arguments critically, to weigh historical evidence, and to draw conclusions; 4) improve their ability to communicate ideas and arguments concisely, accurately, and informatively orally and in writing.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students will be required to 1) watch and prepare various critiques on issues discussed in the video series and the readings; 2) research and make an oral presentation of a key figure or key battle during the Civil War; 3) participate and lead in daily discussions about the video series; 4) attend all class sessions.

PREREQUISITE: None

TEXTS: The Civil War. The complete text of the bestselling narrative history of the Civil War based on the celebrated PBS television series (Paperback) by Geoffrey C. Ward, Kenneth Burns, and Richard Burns

GRADING SYSTEM: Letter Grades

ADDITIONAL STUDENT COSTS: None

CLASS MEETING TIME: 9:00 a.m.

ROOM:  EA 316   

ITM/DEPARTMENTAL PREFIX 421

INTERNSHIP

Contact the Career Development office for more information.