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Physics

Campus Location: 
Crete
School: 
School of Arts and Sciences
Overview

Do you want to look inside an atom, visualize the sound of a trumpet, or gaze on a supernova? Do you want to design a rocket engine that sends people into outer space or program a computer to simulate life? These are just a few of the things a physics major might do. 

We offer both a physics major and minor. Our curriculum emphasizes doing science, not just learning about science, so all courses give students the opportunity to work on experimental and theoretical projects. Many opportunities also exist to work with faculty on research projects while at Doane.

Internships

Doane physics majors may participate in month-long or semester-long internships, gaining hands-on work experience for college credit. Both paid and unpaid internships are available. Recent physics majors have been placed with

•    Glentek, El Segundo, CA
•    Nebraska Department of Roads, Lincoln, NE
•    Square D Schneider Electric, Lincoln, NE
•    U.S. STRATCOM Headquarters, Offutt Air Force Base, Omaha, NE

Pre-Engineering 3-2 Program

Doane students may participate in a dual degree program in engineering that allows students to earn two degrees: a B.A. or B.S. from Doane and a B.S. in engineering or applied science from the engineering school. Normally, students attend Doane for three years and complete the program with two years of study at an engineering school. Doane has formal articulation agreements with the engineering programs at Columbia University (New York), the University of Nebraska - Lincoln, and Washington University (St. Louis), but pre-engineering students may elect to complete their engineering studies at any accredited engineering school in the U.S.

Students completing the three-year pre-professional program at Doane before transferring to an engineering school may graduate from Doane by successfully completing the first year of engineering school and all other graduation requirements.  See the Engineering web page for more information.

Physics Department Web Site