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Jane Goodall to Visit Doane College March 14

Jane Goodall will visit Doane College, March 14Goodall Stop Includes Press Conference, Lecture, and Honorary Degree

Doane College will welcome one of the world's most admired women Wednesday, March 14, when acclaimed scientist, conservationist and author Jane Goodall, Ph.D., DBE, visits campus.

Goodall will conduct a press conference with "Roots & Shoots" chapters from Nebraska and surrounding states. She also will present a lecture and receive an honorary degree from Doane.

The meeting with Roots & Shoots chapters from Doane, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and South Dakota begins at 10:30 a.m. in Doane's Communications Building, Room 02.

At 1:30 p.m., Goodall will receive an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Doane in a ceremony in Fuhrer Field House. Her lecture "Reasons for Hope" follows. The lecture is free and open to the public, however, reservations are required and can be made through Doane's Web site at www.doane.edu/reason4hope or by contacting the Faculty Office at 402.826.8231.

A book signing follows the lecture at approximately 3 p.m.

Goodall's name is synonymous with her landmark study of chimpanzees, beginning in Tanzania in 1960 at the Gombe Stream Chimpanzee Reserve. Her work defied scientific convention. It yielded insights that redefined the relationships between humans and animals and vastly enriched the field of primatology.

The research expanded into a more than 45-year global career of environmental awareness and action.

Highlights include:

  • Goodall established the Gombe Stream Research Center in 1965. It continues today, one of the longest uninterrupted wildlife studies in existence.
  • In 1977, she established the Jane Goodall Institute, which supports the Gombe research and is a global leader in the effort to protect chimpanzees and their habitats. The institute also is widely recognized for establishing community-centered conservation and development programs in Africa, as well as the Roots & Shoots education program, which includes 8,000 groups in 96 countries. Roots & Shoots supports students from preschool through university-level in service-learning projects.
  • The Institute worked collaboratively with zoos and universities to establish ChimpanZoo, an international research program dedicated to the study of captive chimpanzees and the improvement of their lives. About 20 zoos and sanctuaries around the world participate.
  • Goodall has earned scores of honors, including the Medal of Tanzania, the National Geographic Society's Hubbard Medal, Japan's prestigious Kyoto Prize, and the Gandhi/King Award for Nonviolence. Additionally, Goodall was appointed a United Nations "Messenger of Peace," and a "Dame of the British Empire" (the female equivalent of knighthood.) In 2006, she received the French Legion of Honor.
  • She is the author of numerous publications, including the best-selling autobiography Reason for Hope and several children's books. Her latest book is Harvest for Hope: A Guide to Mindful Eating. She also has written two overviews of her work at Gombe: In the Shadow of Man and Through a Window.
  • Goodall has been the subject of numerous documentaries, including several "Discovery Channel" specials. In 2002, she was featured in the large-screen format film, Jane Goodall's Wild Chimpanzees.

Today, Goodall travels an average 300 days per year, speaking of the threats facing chimpanzees, other environmental crises and her "reasons for hope that humankind will solve the problems it has imposed on the earth."

Doane established its Roots & Shoots chapter in 2005, complementing the college's emphasis on leadership and service-learning. Roots & Shoots chapters plan and implement projects that promote "care and concern for animals, the environment and the human community" through activities that range from cleaning up riverbeds to events celebrating different cultures -- each following Goodall's promise that "every individual makes a difference."