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Fulbright Recipient Bio

Malinda's BioMalinda Henry Bio

Dr. Rob Wikel, Dr. Peter Reinkordt, and Dr. Donald Ziegler jump started her scientific career by guiding her toward a Fulbright Grant to conduct botanical research in Göttingen, Germany. 

The year abroad heightened her courage and confidence and gave her life-changing connections to the study of primates in their natural environment and in captivity. Following the Fulbright, she diversified her teaching, research, and working experiences.  She received a Masters of Science in Zoology from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio for her assessment of competition for food between bonobos and humans in Zaïre.  She taught several courses while at Miami and also worked as an assistant to the curator at the Hefner Zoological Museum at Miami.  Close proximity to the Cincinnati Zoo also allowed her to complete two independent research projects examining the social behavior of captive primates.

Between her M.S. and Ph.D.,  she worked as a field assistant studying the behavioral ecology of squirrel monkeys in Suriname and then as an endocrinologist and reproductive physiologist working with various exotic animal taxa at the Henry Doorly Zoo and the University of Nebraska at Omaha.  She further diversified working at the University of Nebraska Medical Center's Eppley Cancer Institute investigating the causes of breast cancer.

She is now on schedule to receive a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland at College Park, from a multi-disciplinary program in Behavior, Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics in May of 2010.  Her research there examines how changes in food abundance affect the physiology and endocrinology of reproduction and nutrition in wild golden lion tamarin monkeys.

"My goal is to understand what is limiting reproduction in this endangered species and to target food resources and habitats that are particularly valuable in terms of tamarin reproduction for conservation."